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>>

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8. Click OK to create the new account.
9. To create a new group, click the Groups tab, click the New button, and enter a
name and personal ID for the new group.
10. To delete a user, click the group he or she is a member of in the Available Groups
list; then locate the name in the Name list and click Delete. To delete a group, click
the Groups tab, highlight the group you want to delete, and click Delete.

Securing the database
Access makes securing the database easy by providing a wizard. Choose
Tools_Security_User-Level Security Wizard, and then follow the instructions, providing
information as needed. At one point you™re asked to choose which objects in the database
should be secured. All secured objects will thereafter be accessible only by users in the
Admin group until you grant other users permissions.
The Wizard makes a backup copy of your database and then encrypts the original.

Note
You can™t run this wizard if the database is open in exclusive mode.


Assigning permissions
To assign permissions, choose Tools_Security_User and Group Permissions. This opens
the dialog box shown in Figure 16-16.




Figure 16-16: You can limit the access of certain users or groups of users to specific
databases and objects by setting permissions.
Chapter 16 ¦ Collaborating on a Network 389

To assign permissions from this dialog box:
1. Click the Users radio button if you want to assign permissions to individual users,
or the Groups radio button if you want to assign permissions to groups.
2. Select the name of the user or group you want to assign permissions to.
3. Select the object you want to assign permissions for from the list of objects, and
select the object type from the drop-down list.
4. Use the checkboxes to set permissions for that user or group: Check boxes to grant
permission for the action described to be performed; uncheck boxes to deny that
permission.
5. When you™ve set permissions for all the users and groups, click OK. You™ll have to
close and open the database again for the permissions to fully take effect.
6. Click the Change Owner tab to assign ownership for the database or objects in it to
someone other than the Admin user.

Encryption
Encryption makes it impossible to view a database file in any other program except Access,
and even in Access you have to decrypt it first. It™s usually used in conjunction with a
password or user-level security (remember, the User-Level Security wizard encrypts the
database as part of securing it).
To encrypt a database:
1. Choose Tools_Security_Encrypt/Decrypt Database.
2. Locate the database you want to encrypt in the Encrypt/Decrypt Database dialog
box, which looks just like a Save As dialog box.
3. Click OK.
4. Another dialog box opens that looks much like the first; in this one, specify the
name and location of the encrypted file.
5. Click Save.
You can save the encrypted file over the original by specifying the same filename and
location.
To decrypt a file, follow the same procedure, but choose an encrypted file to be decrypted
in Step 2.


Distributing Office Documents
Group collaboration on documents requires the capability to save Office documents
somewhere where they are available to everyone in the group. Office provides plenty of help
to that end; the latest development in this process is SharePoint Team Services (STS).
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Even if your organization isn™t running STS, though, you can readily share documents and
link them together by placing hyperlinks in them.
In Windows, any accessible network site shows up in your file-related dialog boxes and in
My Computer, just like local disks and folders.
In Office dialog boxes such as Open and Save As, click the My Network Places icon to
navigate to computers on the network and their folders (or else click on shortcuts you may
have made to those locations, if you™ve gone that route). Once you™ve opened the right
folder, you can store and retrieve documents on another computer exactly as you do those
on your own PC.

Sharing documents via e-mail
Instead of sharing your documents over a network, you can share them via e-mail. This not
only makes it possible for someone who isn™t on your organization™s network to view the
document, it also enables you to more tightly control who sees the document, and when.
To do so, choose File_Send To and choose an option from the resulting menu:
¦ Choose one of the Mail Recipient options to send the document to a single person, or
to several people at once. The disadvantage is that if you™re sending a document to
several reviewers for comments, they™ll all get their own copy of the file. This means
you™ll have multiple copies of the document returned to you, which can be a nuisance.
¦ To avoid that, choose Routing Recipient to specify a series of recipients who will receive
the document one at a time. This allows each of them to see the comments of previous
reviewers, ensures that only one copy of the document is in circulation, and ensures that
you get only a single copy of the document back, one that contains all the comments
from all of the reviewers. You can also set up routing so that you™re notified by e-mail
each time the document is forwarded to a new recipient, and so that the document is
automatically returned to you when the last reviewer on the list is done with it.

Sending a document (without routing it)
There are three versions of the Send To_Mail Recipient command:
¦ Send To_Mail Recipient sends the document in the body of the e-mail.
¦ Send To_Mail Recipient (for Review) sends the document as an attachment and
fills in the Subject line and body with brief messages asking for the document to be
reviewed.
¦ Send To_Mail Recipient (as Attachment) attaches the document to a blank
message, which you then fill in as you want.

Routing a document
To route a document to a series of recipients, choose File_Send To_Routing Recipient. In
the Routing Slip dialog box (see Figure 16-17), select recipients for the routing list by
choosing Address (Outlook will pop up its security dialog box and ask you for permission to
Chapter 16 ¦ Collaborating on a Network 391

access the Address book). The order of recipient names in the To list determines the order in
which they receive the document. You can change the order by selecting a name and
clicking the Move buttons at right.




Figure 16-17: Route a document to a series of recipients using this dialog box.

Supply a subject and any text you want in the accompanying message, and then, at the
bottom of the dialog box, specify whether you want the document to be sent to each
recipient in sequence or to all of them at once. The difference between this option and
simply sending out the document using the Send To_Mail Recipient command is that the
Routing Slip option enables you to track the document™s status and, in Word, protect the
document from unauthorized changes.
Check Return when done if you want to get the document back automatically after the last
reviewer is done with it, and check Track status if you want e-mail notification as it reaches
each recipient
In Word, choose from among the following options in the Protect for list:
¦ Comments. This allows recipients to add comments but prevents them from
changing the document™s contents.
¦ Tracked Changes. This toggles the Track Changes command. By default it is on,
so you can see all changes the reviewers make.
¦ Forms. Use this if the document you™re sending around is a form that you want the
recipients to fill in. They can then fill in the form but not alter the form itself.
¦ (none). This allows recipients to change the document as they want, and there™s no
automatic tracking of the alterations they make, although they can turn Track
Changes on manually if they want.
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To send the document to the first recipient immediately, choose Route. If you prefer, however,
you can close the dialog box without sending the document by choosing Add Slip. When
you™ve decided to send the document, choose File_Send To_Next Routing Recipient.

Sending documents that aren™t already open
You don™t have to open an Office document (or any other file, for that matter) to e-mail it to
someone. Start from within an Office Open or Save dialog box ” or in My Computer,
Windows Explorer, or Outlook™s own file manager. Right-click the document and choose
Send To_Mail Recipient. Outlook creates an e-mail message containing the document as an
attachment; you enter the message text and address.

Posting documents to Exchange folders
If you prefer not to e-mail your document to a large number of recipients, an alternative is to
place it in an Exchange public folder, where it will be available to anyone who has access.
Of course, this works only if your group is using Exchange Server.
With the document open, choose File_Send To_Exchange Folder. A list of Exchange
public folders appears. Specify the destination folder and click OK.

Sending documents to online meeting participants
If you™re participating in an online meeting, you can send an open document to someone
else participating in the meeting by choosing File_Send To_Online Meeting Participant
and choosing from the list provided the participant to whom you want to send the document.


Summary
In this chapter you learned some of the ins and outs of sharing Office information over a
network. Highlights included the following:
¦ You can add a level of protection to Word and Excel documents when you™re
saving them by specifying passwords for opening and/or modifying the file.
¦ You can add protection to Word and Excel files by choosing Tools_Protect
Document in Word and by choosing Tools_Protection in Excel.
¦ You can create a shared workbook in Excel by choosing Tools_Share Workbook.
¦ PowerPoint lets you merge presentations altered by reviewers with your copy and
then provides a Revisions pane and onscreen markup features to help you accept or
refuse the suggested changes.
¦ Access databases are one of the most commonly shared types of Office files. You
can make them freely available or create very tight security for them by using the
commands under Tools_Security on the menu.
¦ E-mail is another way to share Office documents. You can send documents to
individuals or to a sequential group of recipients for review.
¦ ¦ ¦
17 CHAPTER



Windows
SharePoint
Services with . . . .


Office System In This Chapter

What are Windows
SharePoint Services?

Working with lists on
SharePoint sites

W indows SharePoint Services is a Web-based service that
Collaborative
provides a collaboration and information presentation
document authoring
environment that integrates with Microsoft Office 2003
applications such as Word 2003, Outlook, Excel, PowerPoint,
Using powerful Excel-
and Access.
like Datasheet views
Windows SharePoint Services (WSS) is an evolution of
SharePoint Team Services (STS), which shipped with Microsoft Sharing contacts
Office XP. If you have previously used SharePoint Team and calendars
Services, you will find the new and improved features offered by
WSS much more helpful. Windows SharePoint Services has the
Conducting an online
potential to become an integral and extremely useful part of your
meeting with the
everyday Office experience.
Meeting Workspace

Windows SharePoint Services requires installation on Microsoft . . . .
Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition, Enterprise Edition, or
Note
Datacenter Edition. This chapter assumes you have access to a
server running Windows SharePoint Services. If you don™t have
such access, you might still find the information in this chapter
informative. Visit www.microsoft.com/sharepoint/
to locate a SharePoint hosting partner if you don™t have access to
your own SharePoint site.

In this chapter, you learn how to access and use the features of
Windows SharePoint Services to collaborate on your Office 2003
documents. You learn how to create, share, and access Web-based
contacts and calendars. You learn how to work with lists and how
to use the powerful Datasheet list view and calculated columns to
bring the power of Excel to SharePoint lists.
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Working with SharePoint Sites
and SharePoint Lists
One of the central features of Windows SharePoint Services is its use of lists. Lists include
such items as Announcements, Contacts, Events, Links, and Tasks and Issue Tracking. The
placement of these items on a Windows SharePoint Services Web page is up to the site
designer. You can create, access, and modify lists and add new list items via your Web
browser.

Although you can access and use many of the features of Windows SharePoint Services sites
online using Web browsers such as Netscape, it™s better to use Internet Explorer 6 or later when
Note
working with WSS sites. Support for browsers such as Netscape is improved with WSS, but IE
6 and later offer the highest level of support and compatibility.

Many of the features available with lists on Windows SharePoint Services sites are common
to other Windows SharePoint Services items and views. Document Libraries, for example,
are presented in a list-type view.

Accessing SharePoint Services sites
One of the advantages of Windows SharePoint Services is that SharePoint sites can be
accessed via any Web browser that can access the server that hosts the SharePoint site. In
some cases, site access can be restricted to local network users, whereas, in other cases,
SharePoint sites can be accessed over the Internet from any location that can access the
Internet. The capability to access Windows SharePoint Services sites over the Internet makes
WSS a powerful and flexible collaboration environment.

Although you can, and do, perform many tasks with Windows SharePoint Services sites using
a Web browser, such as Internet Explorer, you can more successfully work with Office 2003
Note
documents on SharePoint sites if the Office 2003 application that is associated with those
documents is also installed.

Access methods depend on your administrator and how the site and server that support the
site are configured. In most cases, in order to access a Windows SharePoint Services site,
you need an account on the server that hosts that site. An exception to this is when the site is
configured for anonymous access. Anonymous users have basic read-only access to
SharePoint sites. If you have any difficulty accessing your Windows SharePoint Services
site, contact your SharePoint administrator or the Windows SharePoint Services
documentation if you are the administrator.
When you first receive an account on a Windows SharePoint Services site, you will
usually receive an e-mail similar to that shown in Figure 17-1. Save the e-mail for
future reference.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 395




Figure 17-1: Your invitation to Windows SharePoint Services

You might also receive a separate e-mail specifying the site group you belong to. Site groups
are dealt with in the section of this chapter entitled “Windows SharePoint Services site
permissions.”
The content of the introductory e-mail you receive might differ depending on whether the e-
mail is from a server located on your LAN or on a server on the Internet. The e-mail shown
in Figure 17-1 was generated from a WSS server located on the Internet and contains a
username and randomly generated password in addition to a link to the SharePoint site.

If you receive a welcome e-mail, such as is shown in Figure 17-1, with a randomly generated
Tip
password, take advantage of the Change Password link in the e-mail to change your password
to one you can more easily remember.

Regardless of how you obtain your Windows SharePoint Services V2 login information,
there are three basic pieces of information you will usually need in order to access and work
with SharePoint sites:
¦ The location of the Windows SharePoint Services site. This is in the familiar form
of a URL such as http://Lindy, http://STS.Wigletco.net, or
http://STS.Wigletco.net/mysite/. The form of the URL depends on
the location of the Server hosting the site and the location of the site on that server.
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¦ The username you will use to access and use the Windows SharePoint Services site.
Usernames are usually entered in the format SERVERNAME\username, where
SERVERNAME is the name of the server or domain you are connecting to and
username is, of course, your username.
¦ The password you will use to access and use the Windows SharePoint Services site.
This can be a password generated by SharePoint, or, in some cases, it may be the
password for the account you have on the server that hosts the site or the password
of your domain user account.
To connect to a Windows SharePoint Services site you simply open the URL of the site in
your Web browser. You can do this by entering the URL of the site in the address bar of your
browser or by clicking the link provided in your welcome e-mail.
When accessing a SharePoint site, you might be presented with a login dialog box similar to
that shown in Figure 17-2.




Figure 17-2: Use this dialog box to authenticate your username and password with the
SharePoint server.

If presented with a login prompt, as shown in Figure 17-2, enter your username and password
and then press OK to log on to the site. Refer to the preceding list if you have any difficulties.
If you are not presented with a login prompt similar to that shown in Figure 17-2 when you
attempt to access your site, don™t despair. You might later be presented with the login prompt
or your network might be configured in such a way that you automatically authenticate with
the server.

The login prompt you see when accessing your Windows SharePoint Services site might be
slightly different than the one shown in Figure 17-2, depending on the operating system in-
Note
stalled on the machine you are using. The basic login information you need to provide, however,
remains essentially the same.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 397


Windows SharePoint Services site permissions
The operations you can perform on Windows SharePoint Services sites depend on the site
group you are a member of. Although most site group names and permissions are
configurable by the site administrator, there are five default site groups. The five default
groups and a description of their rights are shown in Table 17-1. Users can also be given
limited access rights to a particular page, Document Library, list, or item in a list without
being specifically assigned to a group.

Table 17-1
Default SharePoint Site Group Permissions
Group Name Description
Guest Users who are given only limited rights to a particular page, Document
Library, list, or item in a list are automatically assigned to the Guest
group. This group cannot be deleted or customized.

Reader Readers are given basic read-only access. They cannot add content and
cannot personalize main sites. They can, however, create their own top-
level sites using Self-Service Site Creation (SSSC) and can personalize
and customize such sites. When a Reader creates their own site using
SSSC, they become the Administrator and owner of that site without
affecting their Reader group membership for any other site.

Contributor Has all the rights of a Reader but can also manage list permissions,
manage personal groups and views, personalize Web Part Pages, and
add content to existing lists and Document Libraries. A Contributor can
personalize Web parts. A Contributor cannot create new lists or Docu-
ment Libraries.

Web designer Has all the rights of Contributor but can also manage lists, delete items,
define and apply themes and borders, link style sheets, and cancel
checkout. Web designers can create new lists and Document Libraries
and can modify the structure of the site.

Administrator Has all the rights of other site groups, plus rights to manage site groups
and view usage analysis data. An Administrator has complete control
over the site. The Administrator group cannot be customized or deleted.



In order for a Reader, or any other user with adequate permissions, to be able to create a top-
level site using Self-Service Site Creation (SSSC), the site administrator needs to have first
Note
enabled SSSC. When SSSC is first enabled, a new announcement is automatically made on
the Announcements list of the home page of the root Web site. This announcement contains a
link to the SSSC tool. SSSC sites are usually contained in the sites directory. A site created
using SSSC is like your own personal little SharePoint site of which you are the administrator.
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398

If, during use of your SharePoint site, you cannot perform the operations you want to,
contact your site administrator and ask for your permissions or group membership to be
changed.

Exploring the Windows SharePoint Services site
Figure 17-3 shows the start page of a typical Windows SharePoint Services site. Your site
might look different but will still contain the same basic elements. The SharePoint main home
page usually contains a Quick Launch Bar and a “main” Web part zone. The Quick Launch
Bar provides quick and easy access to many of the Windows SharePoint Services features.




Figure 17-3: SharePoint sites are presented in the familiar HTML format
in Internet Explorer.

Provided you have adequate permissions, you can customize the site layout to suit your own
personal preferences. You can, for example, minimize existing Web parts or add Web parts
to the main page frame. In Figure 17-3, the drop-down menu for customizing the
Announcements list is expanded, whereas the MSNBC Stock News Web part is minimized.
The Modify this page drop-down menu (shown at the top right in Figure 17-3) is available
on some pages. This allows you to add Web parts and change the design of the main page.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 399

Changes you make are stored in the server database. Log on to the site from another
computer and you see your own personalized pages. Users with adequate permissions can
apply changes made to pages to all other users.

Adding items to existing lists
Links, Announcements, Contacts, Events, Tasks, and the Issue Tracking feature are all
examples of SharePoint lists. Lists provide a place to store and present data in a convenient,
standardized format with some level of customization available. You can add and remove
columns in lists and change the order of fields in a list.
The information stored in lists is available for export to many Office 2003 applications.
Figure 17-4 shows the default view for a Contacts list with an item™s drop-down menu
expanded. The drop-down menu shown in Figure 17-4 allows you to view, edit, or delete the
item. By selecting the Alert Me entry in the drop-down menu, you can choose to receive an
e-mail alert when changes are made to the item or the item is deleted. The default list style
and layout for all lists are similar to that shown in Figure 17-4.




Figure 17-4: You can use the drop-down menu available with selected items to work
with that item.
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You will find the Actions submenu, shown in the left pane in Figure 17-4, in the views of
Tip
many SharePoint libraries. Use the Alert me link to obtain an e-mail notification when items
are added, changed, or deleted. This is particularly useful for new announcements and to
keep your eye on documents, stored in a Document Library, that are modified by other
users. The Export to spreadsheet link allows you to export the list to Excel. You can use the
Modify settings and columns link to customize the display of the library and control many
aspects of the library (including specific permissions for the library, general library settings,
saving the list as a template, and modifying the list template). Explore what options are
available to you. Note that here the term “library” includes all WSS views that are presented
in a list format.

To add new items to an existing list, follow these steps:
1. Select the list by clicking its entry in the Quick Launch bar. You are presented
with a view similar to that shown in Figure 17-4. For Events, Announcements,
Links, and other lists shown in a Web part zone, you can select the item header in
the Web part zone to give a view as shown in Figure 17-4 (to work with
Announcements, for example, select Announcements by clicking the bold
Announcements heading).
2. Select the New Item icon. You are presented with a New Item form customized to
the particular type of list you are working with. For Events, Announcements, Links,
and other lists shown in a Web part zone, you can skip Step 1 and go directly to the
New Item form by selecting the relevant Add new link in the Web part zone (refer
to Figure 17-3).
3. Complete the New Item form with relevant data. Fields marked with a red asterisk
are required. You can also attach a file to the new item via the attach file icon.

For security purposes, Windows SharePoint Services, by default, blocks the saving and retriev-
Note
ing of a number of file types. The SharePoint site administrator can configure the types of files
that are blocked. Consult your administrator if you want to work with blocked file types.

4. Select Save and Close.

Picture Libraries are a special type of list with unique features intended to suit the presenta-
tion of pictures and to integrate with Microsoft Picture Library. You can apply the same skills
Note
you use to create and work with SharePoint lists to Picture libraries. Unique features of
Picture Libraries include the capability to edit pictures in the library directly with Microsoft
Picture Library; the capability to send pictures from the library directly to Outlook, Word,
Excel, or PowerPoint; the capability to download Full Size, Preview, or Thumbnail versions
of the pictures; and a new View Slide Show feature for a stunning presentation of your
pictures.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 401


Creating new Windows SharePoint Services
lists and libraries
Creating new Windows SharePoint Services lists and libraries is easy.
To create a new SharePoint list, follow these steps:
1. Click the bold Lists heading in the Quick Launch bar.
2. In the new Documents and Lists view, click Create List.
3. Choose the type of list you want to create by clicking it. You are presented with six
types of lists to choose from by default: Links, Announcements, Contacts, Events,
Tasks, and Issue Tracking.
4. In the New List Web form, enter a name and description for the list and choose
whether to include the list in the Quick Launch bar. A list description is not
mandatory.
5. Select Create.
New Document Libraries, Form Libraries, Picture Libraries, Discussions, and Surveys can
be created using steps similar to the previous ones. Just replace “Lists” with the type of
library you want to create in the previous steps and choose from the available library
templates for that library type in Step 3.

Libraries of any type can also be created via the Create link in the top bar of the Windows
SharePoint Services home page (see Figure 17-3). The Create link additionally allows you to
Note
create a blank Web page, a Web Part Page, or a WSS Subweb. You can also create a
custom list via the Create link. Custom lists can be created from a basic list that you can add
columns to either using provided templates or in Datasheet view, or can be based on an
existing Excel spreadsheet that already contains the data you want in your list. A Web Part
Page is a special customized SharePoint page, composed from Web parts, that you can
create to consolidate dynamic information into one central location. Datasheet views are
discussed later in this chapter.


Working with Datasheet views and linking lists to Excel
and Access
The Windows SharePoint Services Datasheet view brings the power and familiarity of Excel
to list-type SharePoint libraries. The Datasheet view brings such features as Cut, Copy,
Paste, Fill, and AutoComplete to list-type libraries. Column and row resizing is
implemented, and you can sort and filter data in Datasheet view. Data analysis is available,
and you can chart the list with Excel, export and link the list to Excel, export the list to
Access, or create an Access or Excel PivotTable report from the list all from within
Datasheet view.
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You work with the Datasheet view in much the same way you work with Excel. Cells can be
filled with data, and right-clicking areas of the Datasheet provides context-specific actions
for a single cell, an entire row or column, or the whole list.
To explore the power and some of the features of the lists Datasheet view and the high level
of integration with Excel, this section works through an example.
The example begins by opening Excel and creating a row of header information named
Month, Expenses, and Approved. In the first cell of the Month column, enter January. In the
first cell of the Expenses column, enter a currency such as $2687.43. Leave the first cell of
the Approved column blank. Next, save the Excel spreadsheet with an appropriate name.
You are now ready to create a new list from the Excel spreadsheet. In this example, you™ll
create the list from within Excel and link the WSS list to Excel so that updates made in
either the WSS list or the Excel spreadsheet can be synchronized with the other.
To create a new list from an Excel spreadsheet and link the spreadsheet to the new list,
follow these steps:
1. Open the Excel spreadsheet.
2. Select the cells with data.
3. From the Excel Data menu, select List_Create List.
4. In the new Create List dialog box, ensure the My List Has Headers checkbox is
selected and then press OK.
5. From the Excel Data menu or the List and XML toolbar, select List_Publish List.
If not already visible, the List and XML toolbar can be displayed by right-clicking
a toolbar and selecting it.
6. In the new Publish List to SharePoint - Step 1 of 2 dialog box, enter the location of
the SharePoint server, give the list a name, and enter a description (optional).
7. To ensure that a link is established between Excel and the new list, select the Link
to the new SharePoint list checkbox in the Publish List to SharePoint - Step 1 of 2
dialog box.
8. Select Next. The next Publish List to SharePoint - Step 2 of 2 dialog box gives you
the opportunity to review the data types that SharePoint Team Services V2 will use
for each column.
9. Select Finish.
Your new list can be accessed at any time by opening the original Excel spreadsheet,
selecting the list in Excel, and choosing Data_List_View List on Server from the Excel
main menu or by choosing List_View List on Server from the List and XML toolbar.

You can also create a new Windows SharePoint Services list from an Excel spreadsheet by
Tip
selecting Create from the site Home page and then selecting Import spreadsheet from the
Custom section of the Create Page Web page.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 403

Now that you have the basis of your list created on the server, you are ready to work with
the Datasheet view of the list. You can view and edit any list in Datasheet view by selecting
the Edit in Datasheet link in the view of that list if it is provided.
First, let™s take a look at the Fill feature implemented with Datasheets. The Month column in
the Datasheet example is a prime candidate for demonstrating the Fill feature.
To use the Datasheet Fill feature, follow these steps:
1. Open the existing SharePoint list in Datasheet view.
2. Select the cell you want to use as the basis of the Fill and position your mouse at
the lower-right corner of that cell until the mouse pointer turns into a cross.
3. Left-click and drag the mouse cursor vertically down until you have filled the
number of cells you want.
4. Release the mouse button.
Figure 17-5 illustrates the procedure for using the Fill features with this example. Once the
cursor is released, the enclosed cells are filled with incremented months. Cells are incremented
only if SharePoint can predict some sort of pattern to the cells. If SharePoint cannot predict a
pattern, the Fill method duplicates the initial cell over the range of selected cells.




Figure 17-5: Drag and release to apply the fill to the Datasheet™s columns.
Part II ¦ Collaborating and Integrating with Office 2003
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The Datasheet task pane is shown in Figure 17-5. The Office Links section of the task pane
allows you to export and report a list with Excel or Access. Use the Export and Link to Excel
Note
option if you want to export and link an existing list to Excel. The task pane can be toggled on
and off via the Task Pane link in the top bar in Datasheet view or by clicking the Show Task Pane
arrow on the right side of the Datasheet component.

Next, you™ll change the format of the Approved column in the example to display a drop-
down menu with two options: Approved and Not Approved. Columns can be formatted in
Windows SharePoint Services in a number of formats. The complete list of formatting that
can be applied to columns is: Single line of text, Multiple lines of text, Choice (menu to
choose from), Number, Currency, Date and Time, Lookup (information already on this site),
Yes/No (checkbox), Hyperlink or Picture, and Calculated (calculation based on other
columns).
Note that the format that can be applied to a column depends on the type of list you are
working with and whether you are modifying an existing column or adding a new column.
To format a list column, follow these steps:
1. Open the list in Internet Explorer.
2. In the Actions submenu in the left pane, select Modify settings and columns by
clicking it.
3. In the new Customize page, in the Columns section, select the column you want to
modify by clicking its link.
4. In the Name and Type section of the new page, select the radio button for the type
of format you want to apply to the column. The page updates to provide options
specific to the type of formatting you want to apply.
5. Make any other changes that are required or appropriate. In the case of the Choice
(menu to choose from) format you enter each of your choices, on a separate line, in
the space provided, and can also choose a default value and whether the choice
appears as a Drop-Down menu, Radio Buttons, or Checkboxes that allow multiple
selections.
6. Press OK to return to the Customize page and then select the Go Back link to return
to the newly formatted list.
You can use the same basic procedure to add an existing column to a list. To add a new
column to a list, in the Columns section of the Customize page (Step 3), select Add a new
column instead of the column you want to modify. Adding a new column consisting of
calculations based on other columns is a particularly powerful feature of WSS.
Figure 17-6 shows the completed example with the drop-down menu of Approved and Not
Approved demonstrated. Additional expenses have been entered in the example to complete
the list.
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Figure 17-6: A custom choice and calculated column implemented in Datasheet view

Note the additional calculated column, called Daily Average, in the list shown in
Figure 17-6. The Daily Average is simply Expense/30.
Calculated columns are added to lists using the same basic method you use to add any
column. When creating a calculated column, you are required to enter a formula for that
column and select the data type returned by that formula. In the above example, the formula
for the daily average was entered as =[Expenses]/30 and the data type returned was set
to number. The formula was entered by typing = into the Formula text box, selecting
Expense in the Insert Column list, clicking Add to Formula from below the Insert Column
list, and then typing /30 after [Expense] in the Formula text box.
Calculated columns support formulas using data in other columns and any Excel function
with the exception of the following: Now(), Today(), Me(), and Rand(). Select any
cell in a calculated column and the formula used is displayed in the status bar of the
Datasheet view. When you hover your cursor over a cell in a calculated column in Datasheet
view, the formula applied to that column is displayed as a ToolTip. Double-clicking in a cell
in a calculated column in Datasheet view displays the formula for that column, in the cell,
and allows you to edit it right there. The power of Excel is available with SharePoint lists.
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Note also the Totals row in the list (shown in Figure 17-6). Totals can be calculated simply
by selecting the Totals link in the top bar of the Datasheet view. The type of Totals that can
be performed depends on the format of the columns in the list. In the case of the Month
column in this example, all you can do is to count the months or leave that cell blank. For
the Expense column, the Totals options available are None, Average, Count, Maximum,
Minimum, Sum, Standard Deviation, and Variance.
To select the Totals expression to use in a Totals row, select the cell in the Total row where
the Total will appear and select the type of calculation to be used from the drop-down menu
displayed (by pressing the arrow in the left of that cell).
Figure 17-7 shows the options available for the Totals on the Expense column of the Budget
example.




Figure 17-7: You can perform basic statistical analysis on columns using a Totals row.

Tip
To update the value in a calculated cell, simply select another cell.
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Now that you have an Excel spreadsheet linked to a SharePoint list, you can add data to the
list from within SharePoint or within Excel and easily synchronize those changes.
To synchronize a linked Excel spreadsheet with the SharePoint list it is linked to, follow
these steps:
1. Open the linked Excel spreadsheet with Excel.
2. Select the list in the Excel spreadsheet.
3. From the Data menu in Excel, select List_Synchronize List.
The preceding procedure applies for all Excel spreadsheets that are linked to SharePoint lists
and not just lists created from an Excel spreadsheet.

When a SharePoint list is created from an Excel list that contains a calculated column, WSS
Tip
converts all cells with individual formulas to values. Such converted columns cannot be refor-
matted into calculated columns in WSS. Calculated columns created in SharePoint, however,
when exported to and linked to Excel or synchronized with Excel retain their formulas for direct
use in Excel. If you want to work with a calculated column in both Excel and SharePoint, you
need to create the calculated column in SharePoint.

You can also synchronize an Access table that is linked to a SharePoint list. An Access table
can be created from and linked to a SharePoint list by using the Create Linked Table in
Access option (found in the Office Links section of the Datasheet task pane). An Access
table can also be created and linked to data stored on a SharePoint server via File_Get
External Data_Link Tables in the Access menu. In this case, you need to select SharePoint
Team Services in the Files of Type drop-down menu in the Link dialog box. Doing so opens
a new dialog box from which you can enter or select the SharePoint site.
To synchronize a linked Access table with its SharePoint list, first select Tools_Database
Utilities_Linked Tables Manager from the open, linked, Access database. Next, in the
Linked Table Manager dialog box, select the linked table or tables to be updated and then
select OK.


Collaborative Document Authoring
Windows SharePoint Services provides two features that facilitate collaborative document
authoring: Document Libraries and Shared Workspaces. Both provide the means in
SharePoint where workers, from any location able to access the SharePoint site, can share
documents in real time.
Document Libraries provide a central location intended to store and present almost any type
of file. The exceptions are those file types blocked by SharePoint and your administrator. A
Shared Workspace further enhances a Document Library by adding its own Tasks, Links,
and Members lists. A Shared Workspace is like its own little SharePoint site that focuses
exclusively on collaborative document authoring. Think of a Document Library like you
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would the presentation area for your finished product, whereas a Shared Workspace is like
the back office where you do the majority of your work and collaboration. Although some
level of collaboration is supported in a Document Library, a Shared Workspace is
specifically tailored to document collaboration and provides a high level of integration with
supported Office 2003 applications.

Exploring Document Libraries and Shared Workspaces
Figure 17-8 shows a typical Document Library containing both an Excel spreadsheet and a
Word document.




Figure 17-8: Use a Document Library to store and present important documents.

A Document Library has a default appearance similar to SharePoint lists. The left bar in
Figure 17-8 contains an Actions submenu that can be used in the same manner as discussed
earlier for lists.
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The uppermost bar in Figure 17-8 has the following options:
¦ New Document. Allows you to create a new document in the library using the
default template for that library. The default template for a library is usually
specified when a library is first created. Default Document Library templates can be
set to blank Microsoft Word, FrontPage, Excel, PowerPoint, Blank Page (.aspx Web
page), or Web Part Page documents.
¦ Upload Document. Allows you to upload any supported file to the library. You can
upload multiple files in an Explorer-like view by selecting Upload Multiple in the
Upload Document page that appears after selecting this option.
¦ New Folder. Allows you to create a new folder in the Document Library.
¦ Filter. Enables you to filter columns by adding drop-down filter choices next to the
properties column headings.
¦ Edit in Datasheet. Permits editing of editable document properties in Datasheet
view. You can also access the same features of Datasheet view previously
discussed in the section titled “Working with Datasheet views and linking lists to
Excel and Access.”
The list-type layout of a Document Library provides columns of document properties. By
default these include Type, Name, Modified, Modified By, and Checked Out To. You can
add columns of properties by using the Modify Settings and Columns link in the Actions
submenu shown in the left pane in Figure 17-8. Property columns that are added appear in
the Document Information tab of the Shared Workspace task pane in Word, Excel, or
PowerPoint. To display the Shared Workspace task pane in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint,
select View_Task Pane from the application™s menu and use the drop-down menu in the
task pane to select Shared Workspace.
You can display the drop-down menu shown in Figure 17-8 by selecting the cell in the
Name column of the document or file in question and then selecting the arrow at the right
side of that cell. This drop-down menu is the same regardless of whether you are working
with a file in a Document Library or a Shared Workspace.
The drop-down menu, shown in Figure 17-8, provides the following options:
¦ View Properties. Provides a new view with the document properties.
¦ Edit Properties. Allows you to edit editable document properties including the
filename and custom properties.
¦ Edit in. Allows you to open the file for editing in the application associated with it.
You can also open a file for editing by simply clicking it. The Edit in option is
available only for Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents.
¦ Delete. Allows you to delete a file if permissions allow.
¦ Check Out. Allows you to “check out” a document. A document can be checked
out from a Document Library in a similar way that a book is checked out from a
regular library. When you check out a document, you provide a long-term lock on
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the file that prevents others from making changes to it while you want to work on
it. This options changes to Check In when a document is already checked out.
¦ Version History. When file versioning is enabled, this allows you to View,
Restore, or Delete specific versions of that file. You can view comments on the
file and enable file versioning for the Document Library that file is in via the
Modify Versioning Settings link that appears in the new page when you select
this option.

Note Versioning is not enabled by default when new Document Libraries or Shared Workspaces are
created.

• Alert me. You can use this to receive an e-mail alert when the specific document is
changed or deleted or when a Web discussion on the document has changed.
• Discuss. Displays a discussion bar in Internet Explorer where you can comment on
and discuss the document with your colleagues. Inline discussions can be inserted
in HTML documents only. You can create a discussion about any type of document.
• Create Document Workspace. Allows you to create a Document Workspace
“around” a document in an existing Document Library. When working with a
document in a Shared Workspace created from a source file in a Document
Library, this option becomes Publish to Source Location and allows
synchronization between the file copy in the Document Workspace and the
original source file.
Figure 17-9 shows a typical Shared Workspace containing a central Word document and
other supporting files.
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Figure 17-9: A Shared Workspace is specifically suited to collaborative
document authoring.

A Shared Workspace has an appearance similar to a SharePoint site. You can customize the
site and work with the features just as you would with a regular SharePoint home page.
From within the Shared Workspace you can add members, assign tasks, upload related
documents, add hyperlinks contacts and events, and create and participate in discussions and
surveys all from within Internet Explorer.
The high level of integration between a Shared Workspace and Office 2003 also allows you
to perform many of these tasks, and more that aren™t available via the Web interface, from
within the supported Office 2003 application.
Before delving into working with a Shared Workspace from within Office 2003 applications,
the next section takes a look at how to create your own Shared Workspace.
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Creating Shared Workspaces
You can create a Shared Workspace using any of the following methods:
To create a Shared Workspace for an existing document in a Document Library, follow
these steps:
1. Connect to the SharePoint site with Internet Explorer and open the Document
Library containing the document you want to create a workspace from.
2. Hover your mouse over the Name cell in the name column for the document in
question and select Create Document Workspace from the drop-down menu (see
Figure 17-8).
Use this method when you want to retain a copy of the document in a Document Library
while collaborating on it in a Shared Workspace. You can work behind the scenes on a
document using this method and then publish the final, completed document back to the
original Document Library. To publish a document in a Shared Workspace back to its
original Document Library, select Publish to Source Location from the drop-down menu in
the Name column associated with that file in the Shared Workspace. Users can open the
document from the workspace and work with it as if were saved on their machines. Users
will need to open and then save the document to have their own local copy of the document
that is dynamically linked to the copy in the Shared Workspace.
To create a Shared Workspace from an existing document in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint,
follow these steps:
1. Open the file in its associated application.
2. From the Tools menu in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, select Shared Workspace to
display the Shared Workspace task pane. If a task pane is already visible in the
application, you can simply select Shared Workspace from the drop-down menu at
the top right of that task pane.
3. In the Document Workspace Name section of the Shared Workspace pane, change
the name for the new Document Workspace if you desire. This field will already
contain the name of the open file.
4. In the Location for New Workspace section of the Shared Workspace pane, use the
drop-down menu to select the SharePoint site where the Document Workspace will
be created or enter the location of the SharePoint site.
5. Click the Create button in the Shared Workspace pane.
Use this method when you want to create a Shared Workspace from an existing supported
Office 2003 file type and have your own local copy of the file dynamically linked to the
copy in the Shared Workspace. Other users of the Shared Workspace will need to visit the
workspace and open and save the file to have their own local copies.
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To create a Shared Workspace using Outlook, follow these steps:
1. Create a new e-mail message in Outlook addressed to yourself and others you want
to collaborate with on the document. Users can be added in the To, CC, or BCC
fields.
2. Attach the file you want to use as the basis of the Shared Workspace via the Insert
File paperclip icon in the Outlook toolbar.
3. If the Attachment Options pane is not displayed in Outlook, display it by selecting
the Attachment Options button to the right of the attached file.
4. Select the Shared Attachments option in the Attachment Options pane.
5. In the Create Document Workspace At text box, use the drop-down arrow to select
a SharePoint server to create the workspace on. You can also simply enter the
location of the SharePoint server.
6. Choose the account you want to send the e-mail from and click the Send button in
Outlook to send the e-mail.
Outlook creates a Shared Workspace on the specified server of the same name as the
attached file and sends a hyperlink to the workspace in the sent e-mail. If the attached file
is a Word, Excel, or PowerPoint file, the copy of the file received by the recipient is
linked directly to the newly created Shared Workspace. The recipient can save and work
on the file locally and synchronize changes with the copy stored in the Shared
Workspace. Use this method when you want to create a Shared Workspace and distribute
a copy of the document dynamically linked to the copy in the workspace.
Regardless of which method you use to create a Shared Workspace, the file is available
in the workspace to all users with appropriate access permissions. Users can
simultaneously open and work on a document in a Shared Workspace and update the
copy they are working on with the centrally stored copy in the workspace.

Working with Shared Workspaces inside
Office 2003 applications
Now that you have some familiarity with Document Libraries and Shared Workspaces, and
understand how to create them, you can focus exclusively on document collaboration from
solely within supported Office 2003 applications. Although Document Libraries support
collaboration, this section focuses on using a Shared Workspace. From the applications
covered in this book, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint support the Shared Workspace task pane
with the capability to not only create a Shared Workspace but to also work with the Shared
Workspace from within the Shared Workspace task pane.

Some Office 2003 applications not covered in this book also utilize the Shared Workspace task
Note pane. The skills you learn here to work with the Shared Workspace task pane can be applied to
any Office 2003 application that implements it.
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Figure 17-10 shows the Shared Workspace task pane, displayed in Word, for a local copy of
a document that is linked to a shared copy in a Shared Workspace.




Figure 17-10: You can create and manage a Shared Workspace using the Shared
Workspace task pane.

Regardless of whether you are collaborating on a Word, Excel, or PowerPoint file, the
options and tabs in the Shared Workspace task pane are the same.
Before taking a closer look at how to work with the Shared Workspace task pane, let™s
consider the updating of linked files saved locally when you open and close them and
discuss how to deal with conflicts between local file copies and those on the server.
The first thing you might notice when opening a local copy of a document linked to a central
copy in a Shared Workspace is that the Office 2003 application will ask you whether you
want to check the Shared Workspace for updates to the document. You can choose from
among any of the following options:
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¦ Update. Selecting Update immediately checks the Shared Workspace for updates to
the document. If changes are made to the local copy that is in conflict with changes
made to the central copy, you are prompted to review and resolve the conflicts.
Selecting Yes opens the Document Updates pane from which you can choose to
merge copies, open the workspace copy for comparison, or select one copy to
replace the other.

If, at any time, SharePoint detects conflicts between a local copy and the copy in the Shared
Workspace, those conflicts can be resolved via the Document Updates task pane. When con-
Note
flicts between copies exist, they are reported in the Status tab (the first tab) of the Shared
Workspace pane. The content of and options available in the Document Updates pane depends
on the current status of conflicts between documents. Use of the Document Updates task pane,
when required, is pretty much self-explanatory.

¦ Don™t Update. If you select this option, the document remains linked to the central
copy but many of the Shared Workspace task pane tabs that require a connection
with the server are unpopulated. The Office 2003 application will not then
periodically check the server to determine whether any updates are available. Select
Don™t Update at those times when you want to solely work on a local copy of the
file for a period of time or when the SharePoint site that hosts the file is
inaccessible or access to it is slow. At any time, you can manually check for
updates by pressing the Update button at the bottom of the Shared Workspace task
pane. This will reconnect the local copy to the workspace copy and repopulate
empty tabs in the Shared Workspace pane.
¦ Don™t Ask Again. Selecting this disconnects the file from the Shared Workspace,
thereby removing any link between the local copy of the document and the copy on
the Shared Workspace. Select this only if you are certain you want to unlink the
two copies and not receive any further document updates. If you choose this option
and later want to receive updates to the document, you might need to visit the
Shared Workspace and save a new linked copy of the file to your computer. You
might then need to merge any changes you have made to the local file into the
newly saved and linked file.
When you close the local copy of a linked file, you are presented with only the option to
update the workspace copy with your changes. If conflicts between copies are determined,
you can resolve them using the Document Updates task pane.
You can control how the Office 2003 application checks for updates on opening and closing
the document and the period of automatic update checking via the Options button at the
bottom of the Shared Workspace task pane. Options include the capability to automatically
update on opening and closing (and thereby disable any dialog box prompts) and to globally
turn off automatic updating.
To demonstrate how to use the Shared Workspace task pane, this section works through an
example. In this case, an existing Word document is used. This document can be opened
directly from a Shared Workspace or from a local copy linked to a Shared Workspace.
Remember that the same techniques also apply to Excel and PowerPoint.
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The following operations assume you are working with an open document linked to a Shared
Workspace and that the Shared Workspace task pane is displayed. The document can be
Note
opened directly from the workspace or can be a local copy of the document that is linked to the
workspace. If the Shared Workspace task pane is not displayed, display it via Tools_Shared
Workspace in the application™s main menu.

First, you need to assign members to the Shared Workspace.
To assign members to a Shared Workspace, follow these steps:
1. Select the Members tab in the Shared Workspace task pane.
2. From towards the bottom of the Members tab, select Add New Members to open
the new Add New Members dialog box.
3. In the Choose Members section of the Add New Members dialog box, enter the e-
mail address or usernames of the new members separated by a semicolon.
4. In the Choose Site Group section of the Add New Members dialog box, select the
group you want those new members to be assigned to. If you want to assign new
members to different site groups, you need to add those new members individually.
5. Select Next and then, in the new dialog box that opens, select Finish.

If SharePoint cannot properly identify any users you are trying to add with the host server, you
might be presented with the requirement to enter additional information or to correct existing
Note
information after pressing Next in Step 5. If then, after pressing Finish and confirming that you
do indeed have the correct details entered, you are presented with a new dialog box stating that
the usernames are not valid, you should contact your SharePoint administrator to determine
whether the users you are trying to add have access to the SharePoint site.

6. In the next new dialog box that opens, you can choose to send an e-mail to the
newly added members. To send an e-mail to the new members informing them of
their new membership and their workspace™s location, ensure the Send E-Mail
Invitation to the New Members checkbox is checked.
7. Click OK.
The E-Mail All Members option at the bottom of the Members tab of the Shared Workspace
task pane allows you to send an e-mail to all members at once.
Members are grouped into categories in the Members tab of the Shared Workspace task
pane according to whether they are Online or Offline; you are listed separately at the top of
that pane.
Figure 17-11 shows the Members tab of the Shared Workspace task pane with newly added
members.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 417




Figure 17-11: Use the Members tab to manage and communicate
with workspace members.

You can use the drop-down arrow at the right of the member entry (shown in Figure 17-11
but not expanded) to manage Shared Workspace members. Among the options available,
you can choose to remove the member, edit the member™s group membership, send an
Instant Message to the member (provided that member and you are online), add a member to
Messenger Contacts, edit the member™s user information, schedule a meeting with the
member using Outlook, and add the member to your Outlook Contacts. Additional actions
are available. Explore the Member-entry menu to see which options are available to you.
The online/offline status of members is refreshed when you select the Update button at the
bottom of the Shared Workspace task pane.
Now that you have added members to your Shared Workspace and are aware of how to
manage your members, you™re ready to assign tasks and work with assigned tasks.
To assign a task to a Shared Workspace member, follow these steps:
1. Select the Tasks tab in the Shared Workspace task pane.
2. Select Add New Task from the Tasks tab to open the new Task dialog box.
3. In the Task dialog box, enter a Title, Status, Priority, and a task Description, and
assign the Task as shown in Figure 17-12. Only a Title is compulsory.
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Figure 17-12: Create, use, and assign tasks with the Tasks tab.

4. Select OK.
Completed tasks are displayed with a green tick in the checkbox next to the task in the task
tab of the Shared Workspace pane, whereas tasks not yet started are shown with no fill in
that checkbox. Tasks with any other status are shown with a partly filled checkbox. High
Priority tasks are also marked with a red exclamation mark. You can mark a task as complete
or change the status of a task from complete to incomplete by selecting the checkbox next to
that Task.
You can open the Task dialog box to edit a task simply by double-clicking the task in the
Task tab of the Shared Workspace pane. Alternatively, open the task for editing via the menu
available to the right of the task when that task is selected. This menu also contains options
to delete a task and to create an alert about a task. The capability to create an alert for a task
is also available at the bottom of the Task pane. All options that are available to you when
you create a task are available when you edit the task provided you have adequate
permissions in the Shared Workspace.
Now that you know how to assign tasks, you™re ready to learn how to work with documents
and folders using the Shared Workspace pane.
To add a new document to a Shared Workspace, follow these steps:
1. Select the Documents tab in the Shared Workspace pane.
2. From the bottom of the Documents tab, select Add New Document.
3. In the new Add New Document dialog box, use the Browse button to select a file to
upload. Only single files can be selected. To link the newly uploaded documents to
the local copy of that document ensure the Make Workspace Updates Available
When I Open My Copy checkbox is selected.
4. Press OK.
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To create a new folder, simply select Add New Folder in Step 2, enter the folder name in
the Add New Folder dialog box, and press OK. To view the contents of a folder, click it or
select View Contents from the menu available to the right of that folder. You can also
delete a folder and its contents via the available menu on the right of its entry. Be sure you
don™t delete a folder without first checking that it doesn™t contain important files. To
return to the main view after a folder is in its contents view simply select the folder again.
Documents are added to a folder using the same method as before, but with that folder™s
contents in view.
The menu available to the right of a documents entry in the Documents pane allows you
to delete the document or to obtain an alert when changes are made to the document.
Alerts are also available via the Alert Me About Documents link at the bottom of the
Documents pane. When a document is not the currently open document, the menu to the
left of that document allows you to open the document in its associated application. You
can also open a document in its associated application by clicking its entry in the
Documents pane.
Entries in the Tasks tab are refreshed when you press the Update button at the bottom of the
Shared Workspace pane.
You can easily add links to the Shared Workspace by using the Links tab of the Shared
Workspace pane. Links are added by selecting the Add New Link hyperlink from the bottom
of the Links pane, entering the location, description, and any Notes relevant to the link in the
new Link dialog box, and then pressing OK. From the menu available to the right of the link
in the Links tab, you can choose to edit or delete the link or to receive an alert when that
item is changed.
The Document information tab in the Shared Workspace displays information about the
currently open document. From the Alert me link towards the bottom of the Document
information tab you can choose to receive an e-mail alert when changes are made to the item
or when Web discussions on the item have changed.
The Restrict Permissions link towards the bottom of the Document information tab allows
you to set permissions on the file in the same way that you can via the Permissions button on
the standard toolbar.
You can open, restore, delete, and view comments for versions of the document stored in the
Shared Workspace via the Version History link at the bottom of the Information tab of the
Shared Workspace pane. Versioning can be enabled via the Modify Settings for Document
Versions link in the new Versions Saved For dialog box that opens after selecting the
Version History link. The Version History is also accessible via File_Versions_In a
Document Library from the standard toolbar.
Figure 17-13 shows the Versions Saved For dialog box opened from the Version History link
in the Information tab in the Shared Workspace pane in Word.
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Figure 17-13: Enable and work with versions via the Document Information tab.

To open, restore, delete, or view comments on a document version, simply select that
version in the Versions Saved for dialog box, choose the appropriate action from the options
available on the right, and respond appropriately to any subsequent prompts. Restoring a
document does not delete it but, instead, makes it the current and active available document.
You cannot restore or delete the currently open and active document. Use the Open button to
view the contents of document versions prior to deleting or restoring them unless comments
you have added to the version adequately describe that version.
Comments can be added to a document only when it is checked in. To check in a document
you, naturally, need to have first checked it out. Checking out a document, as covered
previously, provides a long-term lock on the file that prevents others from making changes
to it while you want to work on it. The Check Out and alternate Check In links in the
Document Information tab of the Shared Workspace pane are available only when you are
working with a writeable copy of the file opened directly from the Shared Workspace.

Tip
Check the Status tab (the first tab of the Shared Workspace pane) to determine whether a
document has been checked out and to whom it is checked out.

To check out a document, follow these steps:
1. Open the document from the Shared Workspace by clicking it.
2. If the document opens as a read-only file, select the Save button on the standard
toolbar and select Save in the new Save As dialog box to overwrite the Workspace
copy. This makes the currently open file writeable. This then makes Check Out and
the alternate Check In available in the Document Information tab of the Shared
Workspace task pane. If a Word document was opened from the Workspace in
Reading Layout, for editing purposes, select the Close button on the standard Word
toolbar to change to your preferred editing layout.
3. Select the Check Out link from the bottom of the Document Information pane (see
Figure 17-13).
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To check a document back in and add comments to it, select the Check In link from the
bottom of the Document Information pane, add your comments in the new Check In
Comments dialog box, and then select OK.
A checked-out document can also be checked in, and comments added, when the file is
closed. When closing a checked-out document that is opened directly from a Shared
Workspace, you are prompted to check in the file, keep the file checked out, or to discard
changes and undo the check out. Respond accordingly to your requirements at that time.

To provide a lock on a copy of a document in a Shared Workspace while you work on a local
copy of that file that is linked to the workspace copy, you need to visit the workspace using
Note
Internet Explorer and check out the document using the menu available to the right of that file.
The file remains synchronized to the workspace copy, but only you can make changes that can
be updated to the workspace copy. When you want to check the file back in, simply visit the
workspace again and use the same menu to, this time, check the file in. Comments can then be
added to the file version in the Check In Web page in Internet Explorer.


SharePoint as a Central Contacts
and Calendar Server
Two of the useful features available with Windows SharePoint Services are the capability to
act as a central server for calendars and contacts. You can maintain a central database of
contacts and events that can be linked directly to Outlook and are accessible by anyone with
access to the Contacts and Events folders on the SharePoint site. These features, although
not as powerful as those available with Microsoft Exchange, provide an alternative to
comparable Exchange features when that server is not available.
Linking a SharePoint Events folder (which is essentially a calendar) to Outlook is
particularly useful when you want to compare events in the SharePoint calendar with
another calendar in your Outlook profile.
Figure 17-14 shows a linked SharePoint calendar opened side by side with an Outlook
calendar. Multiple SharePoint calendars can also be opened side by side for comparison.
Part II ¦ Collaborating and Integrating with Office 2003
422




Figure 17-14: View a SharePoint calendar in Outlook

In Figure 17-14, my girlfriend has access to a SharePoint events folder and uses it to remind
me of certain appointments I am “required” to do. You can use this feature for many
imaginable scenarios. Perhaps you want to maintain a SharePoint calendar of company
meetings and events and make that available to all employees from within Outlook.
SharePoint calendars are listed in the Other Calendars section of the Calendar view in the
Outlook Navigation pane. Linked SharePoint calendars are cached for offline use in Outlook
when the SharePoint server is inaccessible. To view a linked SharePoint calendar in
Outlook, simply select its checkbox in Other Calendars. When connected to the SharePoint
server, you can refresh the SharePoint calendar by deselecting and then selecting its entry in
Other Calendars.
Linking a SharePoint Events folder to Outlook (regardless of where it is located on the
SharePoint server), and therefore making its information available in Outlook, is as easy as
opening that Events folder in Internet Explorer, selecting the Link To Outlook link in the top
bar of that folder™s view, and selecting Yes when you receive the prompt from Outlook to
add it.
SharePoint calendars are opened in Outlook as read-only. You need to edit the SharePoint
calendar and add events at the SharePoint site. You can, however, add events from the
SharePoint calendar to your default Outlook from within Outlook. The reverse,
unfortunately, doesn™t apply.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 423

To add an event from a SharePoint calendar opened in Outlook to your default Outlook
calendar, open the calendars side by side and drag and drop the event from the SharePoint
calendar to the Outlook one. You can drag and drop the event into any time slot you choose.

You might need to compensate for differing time zones when adding events from the linked
Tip
SharePoint calendar to one of your other available non-SharePoint calendars. Check with your
SharePoint administrator to determine the time zone used on the SharePoint server.

To remove a linked Calendars folder from Other Calendars, right-click its entry in Other
Calendars and select Remove from Other Calendars.

Making SharePoint contacts available to Outlook
The integration of SharePoint with Outlook also includes the capability to open a SharePoint
Contacts folder as a read-only Contacts folder in Outlook and the capability to import
Outlook contacts into a SharePoint Contacts folder. This is particularly useful when you
want to maintain a shared, central global address list accessible from Outlook to all who
have access to the SharePoint Contacts folder. You can add contacts from your Outlook
address book to the SharePoint Contacts folder and make them available to all others with
access to the SharePoint Contacts folder. SharePoint Contacts folders that are linked to
Outlook can be made available in the Outlook address book and are also available to
Outlook as an address list for checking purposes when Outlook sends e-mail. Linked
SharePoint contacts are cached in Outlook so the information is available offline or when the
server is not accessible.
SharePoint Contacts folders that are linked to Outlook are opened as read-only, and,
therefore, you have to edit the SharePoint Contacts folder at the SharePoint server. You can
drag and drop the contacts from the linked SharePoint Contacts folder to other non-
SharePoint Outlook Contact folders.
To import Outlook contacts into a SharePoint Contacts folder, follow these steps:
1. Connect to the SharePoint site in Internet Explorer.
2. Locate and then open the Contacts folder by clicking its entry. In the case of the
default SharePoint Contacts folder, the link to the folder is found in the Quick
Links section of the main SharePoint Home Page.
3. Select the Import Contacts link in the top bar of the Contacts Web page to open the
Select Users to Import dialog box. This dialog box is a representation of the
Outlook address book.
4. In the Show Names From The drop-down menu of the Select Users to Import
dialog box, select the address list you want to import from.
5. Select the entries you want to import from the main pane in the Select Users to
Import dialog box (a modification of the Outlook address book) and press Add to
add them to the list of contacts to be imported. Use Ctrl+Click to select multiple
entries. Contiguous entries can be selected using Shift+Click. You can resize the
Part II ¦ Collaborating and Integrating with Office 2003
424

Select Users to Import dialog box to more easily locate contacts by dragging the
bottom-right corner of that dialog box. You can also begin typing a contact™s name
in the Type Name or Select From List text boxes to assist in locating a contact.
6. Press OK to finalize the import and to add the selected contacts to the SharePoint
Contacts folder.

Outlook contacts with multiple e-mail addresses and fax numbers are listed in the Select
Users to Import dialog box as separate entries (one entry for each e-mail address and one for
Note
each fax number). When these entries are imported into SharePoint and subsequently viewed
as a linked Outlook contacts folder, each e-mail address and fax number is displayed as a
separate contact.

To link a SharePoint Contacts folder to Outlook, simply select Link To Outlook in Step 3
and then select Yes when prompted by Outlook to add the link.
Contacts folders linked to Outlook are available in the Other Contacts section of the
Contacts view in the Outlook navigation pane. Select the linked SharePoint Contacts folder
from Other Contacts to view its entries. Contacts folders in other Contacts can be enabled or
disabled as an Outlook address book via the Outlook Address Book tab in the Properties
dialog box, which becomes available when you right-click on the entry in Other Contacts
and select Properties. Other options in the right-click menu include the capability to remove
the link from Other Contacts.


Conducting an Online Meeting with the
Meeting Workspace
A Meeting Workspace is a special type of workspace designed specifically to centralize all the
information needed to conduct a meeting. The Meeting Workspace can be used to publish the
attendee list, agenda, and documents you plan to discuss prior to the meeting. After the
meeting, you can use the workspace to track tasks and to publish information gathered during
the meeting. You work with Meeting Workspaces using Internet Explorer in much the same
way as you do with other SharePoint sites. The familiarity you have gained using SharePoint
sites in the rest of this chapter can be easily extended a to Meeting Workspace.
Outlook includes the capability to create a Meeting Workspace and simultaneously invite
attendees while checking on their availability to attend the meeting.
To create a schedule and invite attendees to a Meeting Workspace using Outlook, follow
these steps:
1. Select Meeting request from the drop-down menu next to the New button in the
standard Outlook toolbar.
2. In the To field of the Meeting Request form, enter the e-mail addresses of attendees
separated by semicolons. You can use the To button to select attendees from
Outlook address lists.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 425

3. In the Subject text box of the Meeting Request form, enter a Subject for the
meeting.
4. Complete the Start Time and End Time for the meeting. You can use the Scheduling
tab in the Meeting request form to check the availability of attendees who have
published Free/Busy times and to auto-pick a time for the meeting.
5. Add any notes about the meeting in the Notes area of the form, give the Meeting a
label, set the Show Time As, and link to any Contacts and Categories as required.
6. In the Outlook Meeting request form, select the Meeting Workspace button to
display the Meeting Workspace task pane. You can choose to use the workspace
setting given in the Create a Workspace section of the Meeting Workspace task
pane or customize the Meeting Workspace. If you choose to use the displayed
settings, skip ahead to Step 11.
7. To customize the Meeting Workspace, select Change Settings in the Create a
Workspace section of the Meeting Workspace task pane. This allows you to
reformat the Meeting Workspace pane as shown in Figure 17-15.




Figure 17-15: Create a custom Meeting Workspace and invite attendees
using Outlook.
Part II ¦ Collaborating and Integrating with Office 2003
426

8. In section 1 of the Meeting Workspace pane, Select a Location, you can use the
displayed server or select another server to host the Meeting Workspace. Use the
adjacent drop-down menu to select another server. If the server you want to create
the Meeting Workspace on is not listed, select Other from the drop-down menu and
enter the location of the server in the new Other Workspace Server dialog box.
9. In section 2 of the Meeting Workspace pane, Select a Workspace, you can choose to
create a new workspace or to link to an existing Meeting Workspace. To create a
new workspace, select the Create a New Workspace button. You can choose a
template language for a new workspace from the available templates using the
Select a Template Language drop-down menu. You can choose a template type for
a new workspace from the Select a Template Type drop-down menu. Available
templates include Basic Meeting Workspace, Blank Meeting Workspace, Decision
Meeting Workspace, Social Meeting Workspace, and Multipage Meeting
Workspace.
10. Select OK to refresh the meeting Workspace pane with a similar view as seen in
Step 6.
11. Select Create to create the new workspace. If you chose to link to an existing
workspace, select Link. Outlook will either create a new workspace or link to an
existing workspace depending on your choice in Step 9. The location of the
meeting is automatically entered into the Notes field in the Outlook Meeting
Request form. The Meeting Workspace task pane is updated to provide a link to the
workspace for your own reference and a Remove button from which you can
remove the workspace link.
12. If desired, select an account using the Accounts button in the standard toolbar of
the Meeting Request form and then click the Send button in the standard toolbar of
the Meeting Request form to send the Meeting Request to addressed attendees.
Recipients of the request receive the meeting invitation with a link to the meeting and can
respond to it in the same way that they do to any other Outlook Meeting request.
After the invitation has been sent, the meeting is added to your default Outlook calendar
with a designation of “M” for, of course, Meeting. The Tracking tab on the opened meeting
allows you to track responses to your invitation. Use the hyperlink in the Notes section or in
the Meeting Workspace task pane of the opened Meeting to customize and prepare the
workspace for your meeting.


Summary
In this chapter, you learned how to access a Windows SharePoint Services site and about site
permissions. You learned how to create lists using SharePoint and Excel, how to use the
powerful Datasheet view to present data in an Excel-like view and perform Excel-like
calculations, and how to dynamically link lists to Excel and Access. You learned how to
create and use a Shared Workspace to collaborate on documents from within Office 2003,
and how to add new workspace members and assign tasks using the Shared Workspace pane.
Chapter 17 ¦ Windows SharePoint Services with Office System 427

You learned how to view and use SharePoint contacts and events in Outlook, and how to
create a Meeting Workspace with Outlook.
¦ SharePoint provides the powerful Datasheet list view that allows you to perform
Excel-like calculations and dynamically link lists to Excel and Access.
¦ You can create and manage a Shared Workspace from within Word, Excel, and
PowerPoint, allowing you to collaborate on documents with anyone who can access
the workspace.
¦ SharePoint provides default Web pages and event, contacts, announcements, tasks,
and shared document components that are highly flexible and customizable to suit
your needs or personal preferences.
¦ SharePoint allows you to share central calendar and contacts databases with any
user who can access the SharePoint site and to access and use those databases
in Outlook.
¦ SharePoint site permissions can restrict user groups to have specific rights on the
SharePoint server.
¦ You can send a meeting request with Outlook and simultaneously create a
specialized Meeting Workspace to help facilitate the meeting.
¦ SharePoint provides a high level of security such that access to the server can be
restricted. You might need to log on to the server to use it.
¦ ¦ ¦
P A R T




III
Beyond Mastery:
Initiative . . . .


within Office In This Part

Chapter 18
Getting Organized with
Outlines and Master
Documents in Word


T his part is comprised of chapters that are the special “extras” Chapter 19
that many people know about, but might not be quite as Processing Outlook
familiar with as some of the other day-to-day functions. Now that Messages Automatically
you™ve read a sampling of the meat-and-potatoes functions in
each application, and then how to more efficiently work with
Chapter 20
your coworkers and other applications, these chapters should
Analyzing Data with
enable you to take the initiative and go that next step.
Pivot Tables in Excel

Chapter 21
Designing User
Interactive PowerPoint
Presentations

Chapter 22
Adding Security to
Access Applications

Chapter 23
Adding FrontPage Web
Components

Chapter 24
Advanced Publisher
Techniques


. . . .
18 CHAPTER



Getting
Organized with
Outlines and . . . .


Master In This Chapter


Documents Creating, editing, and
arranging outlines

Adding numbers to
outline headings

Formatting and
printing outlines

I n this chapter, you learn how to use outlines to organize your
Building and
thoughts and give focus to your ideas. In addition, you learn
formatting master
how the master document feature, which builds on Word™s
documents
outlining techniques, makes it easy to apply consistent formatting
to long documents by combining small documents into a large
Creating and editing
framework.
subdocuments

Using Outlines . . . .
The outline feature in Word is intertwined with the heading
styles. When you create an outline, Word automatically assigns
the appropriate heading style to each level of the outline. For
example, a level one heading uses the Heading 1 style, and if you
change the heading to level two, that heading automatically takes
on the Heading 2 style. Conversely, assigning a standard heading
style to text in Normal or Page Layout view automatically
prepares the document for an outline. Therefore, if you use the
standard heading styles as you create the document, you can also
make an outline of the document simply by switching to Outline
view (View_Outline).

You can format heading styles just as you do any style in Word.
Cross-
Reference For more on working with styles, see Wiley™s Word 2003 Bible,
Chapter 13.
Part III ¦ Beyond Mastery: Initiative within Office

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