<<

. 3
( 14)



>>




Figure 3-6: Use the Security page to enable encryption and specify authentication
settings.

Following is an explanation of these settings:
Encrypt Information. Use this option to enable encryption to secure transmission
between the client and server computers. Always Prompt for User Name and Pass-
word. Select this option to require Outlook to prompt you for your account and
password, rather than caching it and logging on automatically. You should use this
option if you leave your computer unattended or share a computer with others.
Logon Network Security. Choose the authentication method required by your server.
Use Password Authentication (NTLM) if your Exchange Server is running on Windows
NT or you need to use NTLM when accessing a Windows 2000 or Windows 2003
Server. Choose Kerberos if your Exchange Server supports Kerberos-based authentica-
tion. Kerberos is the default authentication mechanism for Windows 2000 and Win-
dows 2003 Server platforms.

The Distributed Password Authentication (DPA) option available in Outlook 2002 is not included
Note
with Outlook 2003.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 61


Configuring connection settings
Use the Connection page of the Exchange Server™s additional settings (Figure 3-7) to tell
Outlook how to connect to the Exchange Server. Choose an option based on the following list:
Connect Using My Local Area Network. Select this option if you connect through a
LAN, or want to use a dial-up connection that is already dialed and connected.
Connect Using My Phone Line. Select this option to use a specific dial-up connection
to the Internet or server™s network. Use the Modem group of controls on the page to
select the dial-up connection and set its properties.
Connect Using Internet Explorer™s or a 3rd Party Dialer. Select this option to use
the dialer configured in Internet Explorer, or to use a third-party dialer included with
other network client software.




Figure 3-7: Use the Connection page to specify how Outlook connects to the Exchange
Server.

The option Connect to my Exchange Mailbox Using HTTP lets you connect to the server
across the LAN or Internet using the HTTP protocol. This connection method enables you to
connect to an Exchange Server sitting behind a firewall that blocks traffic other than HTTP
(port 80). It™s also a handy mechanism for remote users who need to access an Exchange
Server across the Internet but don™t want to use Outlook Web Access (OWA) or when OWA
isn™t supported on the server.
Click Exchange Proxy Settings to open the Connection dialog box (Figure 3-8), which
enables you to specify proxy settings for the connection to the server. These settings are
self-explanatory.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
62




Figure 3-8: Use the Connection dialog box to configure proxy settings for the connection.


Configuring Remote Mail settings
You can use the Remote Mail page to configure general options for using Remote Mail with
the Exchange Server account. Remote Mail enables you to retrieve headers only and/or
retrieve only those messages that fit the filter criteria you specify.

Configuring POP3 and IMAP accounts
Post Office Protocol 3 (POP3) has long been the primary protocol used by Internet mail
servers. POP3 is gradually being replaced by Internet Mail Access Protocol (IMAP), and by
HTTP-based mail, such as that used by Hotmail and Yahoo!. Both POP3 and IMAP are
standards-based, public protocols supported by a wide variety of mail servers. Most Internet
Service Providers (ISPs) that offer mail accounts support both POP3 and IMAP.
POP3 is primarily an offline protocol, which means you download the messages from the
server and work with them locally. IMAP, by contrast, is primarily an online protocol. You
work with your IMAP folders and messages from the server. The fact that the messages
remain on the server simplifies the synchronization problems (such as having messages
scattered on different computers) you would otherwise face if you needed to access the same
POP3 account from more than one computer. Another useful benefit to IMAP is the
capability it gives you to selectively process messages and attachments without downloading
them from the server; however, you can gain most of these advantages for all account types
by using Outlook™s Remote Mail features.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 63


IMAP offers better security than POP3 because it uses a challenge-response mechanism to
Tip
authenticate the user, rather than passing the password across the network as plain text.

If your server supports both POP3 and IMAP, this author recommends using IMAP. The
configuration process is essentially the same for each.
1. Start the E-mail Accounts Wizard from the Mail applet in the Control Panel and then
click E-mail Accounts. Alternatively, choose Tools_E-mail Accounts in Outlook.
2. Choose Add a New E-mail Account and then click Next.
3. Choose POP3 if adding a POP3 account, or IMAP if adding an IMAP account; then
click Next.
4. On the Internet E-mail Settings page (Figure 3-9), specify settings according to the
following list:
Your Name. Specify your name as you want it to appear in the From field of messages
that others receive from you through this account.
E-mail Address. Enter the e-mail address for the account in the form
account@domain, such as jim@boyce.us.
Incoming Mail Server. Specify the IP address or DNS name of the server where your
mailbox is located.
Outgoing Mail Server. Specify the IP address or DNS name of the SMTP server that
this account should use for sending outgoing mail. The outgoing and incoming servers
need not be the same, and in the case of large ISPs such as CompuServe, are often
different.
User Name. Enter the name of your mailbox or logon name on the server. Typically,
this is the first part of your e-mail address. Do not include the @domain portion of the
address.
Password. Specify the password associated with the account you entered in the User
Name field.
Remember Password. Select this option to have Outlook cache the password. Clear
the option if you want Outlook to prompt you for the password each time it connects to
the server. Clearing this option provides better security and prevents others from
retrieving your mail when you are away from the computer.
Log On Using Secure Password Authentication (SPA). Select this option if the mail
server requires SPA for authentication. Most mail servers do not.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
64




Figure 3-9: Use the Internet E-mail Settings page to configure basic account properties
for POP3 and IMAP accounts.


You can click Test Account Settings when creating a POP3 account to send a test message
Tip
through a specified outgoing mail server and attempt a logon to the incoming mail server. This
helps you verify your settings before you finish creating the account.

In most situations you can click Next and then Finish at this point to create the account;
however, you can configure additional settings, if needed. Click More Settings to display the
Internet E-mail Settings property sheet. The General, Outgoing Server, and Connection
pages are the same for POP3 and IMAP accounts. Most of the options on the Advanced page
are the same, with a few exceptions. The following sections describe the available options.

General settings
Use the Mail Account field on the General page to specify the account name as you want it
to appear in Outlook™s list of accounts. You can add a company or organization name in the
Organization field. These settings are optional.
Use the Reply E-mail field to specify the reply to message property for the account. By
default, the account uses the e-mail address you specify in the E-mail Address field for the
account as the reply address. In some situations, however, you might want these to be
different. For example, you might want replies sent to a discussion list rather than to your
own mail address.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 65


Outgoing server settings
Use the settings on the Outgoing Server page to enable authentication for your SMTP server.
You can use the same authentication credentials as for the incoming server, or specify a
different account and password. You can also configure the account to use Secure Password
Authentication (SPA) for the outgoing server, if required.
POP3 accounts have an additional setting on this page: Log on to incoming mail server
before sending mail. Enable if your account is serviced by the same server for incoming and
outgoing mail, and requires that you authenticate to send messages.

Connection settings
Use the Connection page to specify how Outlook should connect to the server(s) to send and
receive messages. Use the LAN option if you connect through a network, or want to use
whatever dial-up connection is already established at the time you perform a send/receive.
The option Connect via modem when Outlook is offline, if enabled, causes Outlook to dial
the connection specified by the Modem options when Outlook detects that the server is
offline. Check your operating system™s Help documentation if you need help configuring a
dial-up account.

Advanced settings
The Advanced page differs slightly between POP3 and IMAP accounts. Figure 3-10 shows
the POP3 version.




Figure 3-10: The Advanced page for POP3 accounts.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
66

Figure 3-11 shows the IMAP version.




Figure 3-11: The Advanced page for IMAP accounts.

The Incoming and Outgoing server options specify the ports on which the mail servers are
configured to respond to incoming and outgoing mail requests, respectively. (In this usage,
incoming means mail coming from the server to you, and outgoing means mail going from
your computer to the server.) The default port for POP3 is 110 and is 143 for IMAP. The
default SMTP port is 25. For both POP3 and IMAP, you can select the SSL connection if the
server requires SSL for added security.
Use the Server Timeouts slider to set the amount of time that Outlook will wait for the server
to respond to requests before timing out. Increase the timeout if you are working over a slow
connection or with a busy server that tends to time out your sessions before they complete.

POP3 delivery
A POP3 account™s properties include a Delivery group of options that determine how
Outlook handles the messages on the server. These options are:
Leave a Copy of Messages on the Server. Download a copy of the message from the
server, but don™t delete the original from the server. Use this option when you want to
be able to retrieve the messages from other computers, or when you are troubleshooting
and don™t want Outlook to remove the messages from the server.
Remove from Server After n Days. Select this option to have downloaded messages
removed from the server after the specified number of days has elapsed.
Remove from Server When Deleted from ˜Deleted Items™. Select this option to have
Outlook remove the messages from the server when they are removed from the Deleted
Items folder, either manually by you or automatically by Outlook.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 67


IMAP folders
The Advanced page for an IMAP account contains only one setting that is different from
those for a POP3 account. The Root Folder Path specifies the path to the folder in your
mailbox that you want to use as the root folder for the mailbox. Leave this field blank if
you™re not sure of the folder path, and Outlook will use the default root for the account on
the server.

Understanding where Outlook stores your POP3
and IMAP messages
When you add a POP3 account and you already have a default mail store configured for the
profile such as an Exchange Server mailbox, set of personal folders, or PST file, Outlook
uses that default mail store as the delivery location for your POP3 mail. The other folders in
the default store serve to contain the Calendar, Contacts, and other non-mail folders. If there
are no other existing accounts, Outlook creates a PST to contain the message store. It uses
this same PST to store the nonmail items, as well.
When you create an IMAP account, Outlook automatically creates a PST to contain the
IMAP account™s folders. It does this even if you already have a message store for another
account. Each IMAP account you add gets its own PST. Outlook also creates a PST to
contain your nonmail Outlook folders.

Configuring HTTP accounts
Similar to Outlook 2002, Outlook 2003 supports HTTP-based e-mail accounts for MSN and
Hotmail. Follow these steps to configure an HTTP account:
1. Start the E-mail Accounts Wizard from the Mail applet in the Control Panel, and
click E-mail Accounts. Alternatively choose Tools_E-mail Accounts in Outlook.
2. Choose Add a New E-mail Account and then click Next.
3. Choose HTTP, and click Next.
4. On the Internet E-mail Settings page (Figure 3-12), specify settings according to the
following list:
Your Name. Specify your name as you want it to appear in the From field of messages
that others receive from you through this account.
E-mail Address. Enter the e-mail address for the account in the form
account@domain, such as jimboyce999@hotmail.com.
HTTP Mail Service Provider. Select either Hotmail or MSN, depending on your
account type. You can select Other if you have the URL of an HTTP mail server
compatible with Outlook.
Server URL. This field is read-only for Hotmail and MSN accounts. Enter the URL for
your mail server if you selected Other from the HTTP Mail Service Provider drop-
down list.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
68

User Name. Enter the name of your mailbox or logon name on the server. Outlook
creates this field automatically if you choose the MSN or Hotmail server options based
on your e-mail address.
Password. Specify the password associated with the account you entered in the User
Name field.
Remember Password. Select this option to have Outlook cache the password. Clear
the option if you want Outlook to prompt you for the password each time it connects to
the server. Clearing this option provides better security and prevents others from
retrieving your mail when you are away from the computer.
Log On Using Secure Password Authentication (SPA). Select this option if the mail
server requires SPA for authentication. Most mail servers do not.




Figure 3-12: Use the Internet E-mail Settings page to configure basic account properties
for POP3 and IMAP accounts.

As with other types of accounts, you can click More Settings to set a handful of other
options. These are the same as those on the General and Connection pages specified in the
sections, “General settings” and “Connection settings,” earlier in this chapter.


Adding Data Files
The previous section explained how to add e-mail accounts to an Outlook profile. When you
add a POP3 account with no existing Exchange Server account, Outlook creates a personal
folder file (PST) for you to store your messages. If this is the only account, Outlook also
stores your nonmail items (Calendar and so on) in the PST.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 69

When you add an IMAP account to a profile, Outlook creates a PST specifically for the
IMAP account. It does not, however, store your nonmail items in the IMAP PST. Instead,
Outlook creates a separate PST to store those items.
Although Outlook automatically creates PSTs as needed when you add accounts, you might
want to add your own PSTs to a profile. For example, perhaps you use an Exchange Server
account for your primary Outlook store, but want a set of personal folders to serve as an
archive; or perhaps you have an Exchange Server account and are adding a POP3 account.
Outlook will, by default, deliver your POP3 messages to the Exchange Server mailbox, but
you can create a rule that moves them to the PST after they come in.
If you™re interested to learn more about rules and how to create them, see chapter 8 of
Wiley™s Outlook 2003 Bible.
Follow these steps to add a set of personal folders to your profile:
1. If Outlook is not running, right-click the Outlook icon and then choose Properties, or
open the Mail applet from the Control Panel. Click Data Files to open the Outlook
Data Files dialog box (Figure 3-13). If Outlook is running, choose File_Data File
Management.




Figure 3-13: The Outlook Data Files dialog box.

2. Click Add to display the New Outlook Data File dialog box (Figure 3-14). Choose
one of the following options:
Microsoft Outlook 97-2002 Personal Folders File (.pst). Choose this option to create
a PST that is compatible with other Outlook versions. Use this type of PST if you need
to share a PST between different versions of Outlook.
Microsoft Outlook Personal Folders File (.pst). Choose this option to create a PST
that is not compatible with previous Outlook versions, but which supports a larger PST
file size and multilingual Unicode data.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
70




Figure 3-14: The New Outlook Data File dialog box.

3. Outlook displays the Create or Open Outlook Data File dialog box, which is similar
to the standard Outlook Open or Save dialog box. Choose a location and file name
for the PST, and click OK.
4. In the Personal Folders dialog box (Figure 3-15), enter settings according to the
following list:
Name. Specify the name for the PST as you want it to appear in the Outlook folder list.
Using a unique name will help you identify the set of folders more easily.
Encryption Setting. Choose No Encryption if you don™t want to use encryption for the
PST. Choose Compressible Encryption to use encryption that also allows the PST to be
compressed to conserve disk space (this is the default). Choose Best Encryption to
provide extra security at the expense of losing compression capability for the PST.
Password. Enter and confirm an optional password to protect the PST, and choose the
Save This Password in Your Password List to have Outlook cache the PST password in
your password cache. Use this option if you are concerned that others might be able to
access your computer and view the items in the personal folders.




Figure 3-15: The Create Microsoft Personal Folders dialog box.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 71

5. Click OK to create the PST; then click Close.
After you add a PST, it appears in the folder list under its own branch. The branch name
comes from the Name field you specify when you create the PST.


Creating and Managing Outlook Profiles
An Outlook profile stores a set of accounts and their associated settings such as the data
files associated with the profile. In most cases you will have only one profile that contains
all of the accounts that you use. In a few situations, however, you might need to create
additional profiles on a computer. For example, even though Outlook can handle multiple
e-mail accounts in one profile, you might prefer to keep your work account separate from
your personal accounts. Or, maybe two users work with the same computer and each need
their own profiles.
You can configure Outlook to use a particular profile by default, or you can configure it to
prompt you to choose a profile when Outlook starts. Use the former when you work from the
same profile most of the time, and use the latter when you need to change profiles frequently.
Keep in mind that Outlook profiles have nothing to do with the other kinds of profiles you
will find on a typical Windows computer, including hardware profiles, user profiles, or even
Office settings profiles. Outlook profiles store the accounts and related settings for Outlook
only, not for any other application or system.
Outlook profiles store specific types of information, including the following:
Services. This includes data file properties and settings for each of the e-mail accounts
in the profile. Services can also include address books, LDAP directory service settings,
and third-party services such as one that delivers faxes to your Inbox.
Delivery Settings. An Outlook profile stores settings that determine where it should
deliver new incoming messages.
Address Settings. The profile stores settings that determine which address book
Outlook uses by default and the address book order it uses to validate e-mail addresses.
When you run Outlook for the first time, it steps you through the process of adding a profile
and creating an e-mail account for the profile. The following section explains how to create
a new profile.

Creating an Outlook profile
You can add to or modify the contents of a profile in Outlook, but you can™t create a profile.
Instead, you must use the following steps:
1. Open the Mail applet in the Control Panel, or right-click the Outlook icon and then
choose Properties to open the Mail Setup dialog box.
2. In the Mail Setup dialog box (Figure 3-16), click Show Profiles to display the Mail
dialog box (Figure 3-17).
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
72

3. Click Add to display the New Profile dialog box, enter a name for the profile, and
click OK.
Two options on the Mail dialog box control how Outlook handles multiple profiles:
Prompt for a Profile to be Used. Select this option to have Outlook display a dialog
box when the application starts from which you choose the profile to use.
Always Use This Profile. Select this option if you want Outlook to use a particular
profile automatically. Select the desired profile from the drop-down list.
4. The E-mail Accounts Wizard launches automatically. Use the wizard to add ac-
counts, address books, or directory services to the profile. When you complete the
wizard, you™ll be returned to the Mail dialog box. Create any other profiles as
needed, and set the default profile as explained next; then click OK.




Figure 3-16: Use the Mail Setup dialog box to access the profiles stored in the user™s
profile.




Figure 3-17: The Mail dialog box shows all existing profiles within the user™s system
profile.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 73


Copying a profile
In some cases you might want to use the settings from an existing profile but make certain
changes, such as create two profiles that include a common e-mail account but which each
have a unique secondary account. If that™s the case, you can copy the existing profile and
then modify the copy. To do so, open the Mail dialog box as explained in the previous
section; then click Copy. Specify a name for the new profile, and click OK. You can then
modify the newly copied profile as needed.

Switching between profiles
If you maintain multiple Outlook profiles, it™s likely that sooner or later you will need to
switch to a different profile. If you switch frequently, the best approach is to configure
Outlook to prompt you to select a profile when Outlook starts. The section “Creating an
Outlook profile” earlier in this chapter explained how to do that.
There is no mechanism in Outlook to change profiles dynamically. You must exit Outlook
and, unless you™ve configured Outlook to prompt you for a profile at startup, change the
default profile before starting Outlook again. Here are the steps to take:
1. Open the Mail applet from the Control Panel and click Show Profiles to open the
Mail dialog box.
2. Select Always Use This Profile and then select the required profile from the list.
3. Click OK, and start Outlook to use the new profile.


Configuring Message Delivery Options
When an Outlook profile contains more than one e-mail account, Outlook prioritizes them
and uses the one with the highest priority as the one through which it sends e-mail by
default. For example, if you have an Exchange Server as well as a POP3 account in a
profile, and the Exchange Server account is at the top of the account list, Outlook will send
new messages through the Exchange Server account.
You can choose an account when you compose a message, and Outlook will send the
message through that account. To use a specific account, start a new message, click the
Accounts button in the toolbar, and select the account. Compose the message and then click
Send. Outlook will send it through the specified account.

The Accounts button doesn™t appear unless you have at least two accounts set up.
Note



You can easily change the account order so that Outlook uses a different account by default
for outgoing messages:
1. In Outlook, choose Tools_E-mail Accounts.
2. Choose View or Change Existing E-mail Accounts and then click Next.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
74

3. Select an account in the list, and click Move Up or Move Down to adjust the
account list. Set the desired account at the top of the list.
Setting the account order does more than just set the account Outlook uses by default for
outgoing messages”it also changes the order in which Outlook processes accounts. Outlook
performs sends and receives for multiple accounts in the order they are listed. Moving an
account up in the list means it will be processed before those below it.
One other change you might want to make for the profile is to specify the account to which
incoming mail is delivered. For example, imagine you have a POP3 account and an
Exchange Server account. In most cases you™ll likely want to leave the Exchange Server as
the location for incoming mail; however, you might decide to deliver mail to the POP3
account, which uses a local PST, because of network considerations or other reasons.
Here are the steps needed to specify the incoming mail store:
1. In Outlook, choose Tools_E-mail Accounts.
2. Choose View or Change Existing E-mail Accounts and then click Next.
3. In the E-mail Accounts dialog box (Figure 3-2), choose the mail store from the
Deliver New E-mail to the Following Location drop-down list.
4. Click Finish.


Setting Your E-mail Options
After you have the Internet e-mail service properly configured, you can set your e-mail
options. There are lots of these options, some more critical than others. In the following
sections, you have the opportunity to take a look at these settings so that you can learn how
the e-mail options affect you and your use of Outlook. Some of these settings will also be
covered in more detail in Part II of this book.

Setting the e-mail preferences
The e-mail preference settings affect the appearance and handling of your e-mail messages”
from what happens to messages you send to how replies are handled.

To set your e-mail options, follow these steps:
1. Select Tools_Options to display the Options dialog box. Click the Preferences tab if
necessary to bring it to the front.
2. Click the E-mail Options button to display the E-mail Options dialog box, shown in
Figure 3-18.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 75




Figure 3-18: Choose the basic e-mail options in this dialog box.

3. Select an action from the After moving or deleting an open item drop-down list box.
This specifies what you want to do when you close a message.
4. Select Close original message on reply or forward so that you won™t return to a
message you™ve replied to or forwarded. If you don™t select this check box, you™ll
need to close the original message yourself.
5. Select Save copies of messages in Sent Items folder to always save a copy of any
messages you send. If you don™t select this option, there will be no record that
you™ve sent messages, except in the Journal if those contacts have been selected for
recording in the Journal. Be sure to clean out the Sent Items folder occasionally if
you™ve selected this option.
6. Select Automatically save unsent messages to place copies of messages you™ve
begun but not yet sent in the Drafts folder.
7. Select Remove extra line breaks in plain text messages to have Outlook remove
extra line breaks in plain text messages, which compresses the message somewhat
and can make them easier to read.
8. Select Read all standard mail in plain text to have Outlook remove formatting in
messages.
9. Use the On replies and forwards options to specify how you want to handle the
original text of a message that you reply to or forward. You can only choose a line
prefix for the original message if you select the Prefix each line with option. It™s
become an Internet e-mail custom to prefix the original message lines with a greater-
than symbol (>), but you can use the options you prefer.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
76


Some of these e-mail option settings are codependent; others are mutually exclusive. For ex-
Tip
ample, you will not be able to use a character to prefix the lines of the original messages when
replying to messages if you also choose to include and indent the original message.

10. Click the Advanced E-mail Options button to display the Advanced E-mail Options
dialog box, shown in Figure 3-19.




Figure 3-19: Choose the advanced e-mail options in this dialog box.

11. Choose the options you prefer from this dialog box. These options are generally self-
explanatory. Use the following list as a guide:
Save messages. These options control whether Outlook saves unsent messages, saves
replies along with an original message, and saves forwarded messages in the Sent Items
folder.
When new items arrive. Use these options to specify the actions that Outlook takes
when new messages arrive.
When sending a message. These options set the default sensitivity and importance
for new messages and the options that Outlook makes available when you create a
new message. In addition, the Add properties to attachments to enable Reply with
Changes option, if enabled, makes it possible for recipients of messages with attach-
ments to make changes to the attached document and then reply back to the sender
with those changes.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 77


Although you can set the importance and sensitivity level for messages, these settings gener-
Note
ally accomplish very little in the real world. Mail recipients can choose to observe or ignore both
of these settings with impunity, which is one of the reasons that they are seldom used.

12. Click OK to close the Advanced E-mail Options dialog box.
13. Click the Tracking Options button to display the Tracking Options dialog box,
shown in Figure 3-20.




Figure 3-20: Set tracking options in this dialog box.

14. Choose the tracking options you prefer. Be aware of the differences between the two
receipt request options:
• A read receipt is a message that tells you the recipient has actually opened your
message.
• A delivery receipt is a message that simply tells you your message was delivered.
The message recipient may choose to ignore all your messages, even if they are
delivered, so a delivery receipt won™t confirm that your message was actually
read.
15. Choose how you want to respond to read receipt requests.

Notice that because you can turn off responses to read receipts, a sender can never be certain
Tip that you™ve actually opened a message. It™s relatively difficult to block the sending of delivery
receipts, so both types of receipt requests do serve a useful function when it™s important to
know that your message arrived at its destination.

16. Click OK to close the Tracking Options dialog box.
17. Click OK to close the E-mail Options dialog box.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
78


Setting the mail format options
The mail format options affect the default appearance of outgoing e-mail messages that you
create. Figure 3-21 shows the Mail Format tab of the Options dialog box so you can get a
feel for all the available mail options.




Figure 3-21: The Mail Format page

The Mail Format page contains three option groups:
Message Format. These options enable you to specify either Word or Outlook as your
default mail editor, the default message format for new messages, and whether Outlook
uses Word or Outlook to read rich text messages. Click Internet Format to specify how
Outlook handles HTML- and rich text-based messages, as well as plain text messages.
You can also specify that Outlook use the UUENCODE format to encode attachments
for plain text messages.
Stationery and Fonts. Use this group of options to specify a default stationery, which
is a background and other elements that create a custom look for your messages. Click
Fonts to specify the fonts that Outlook uses for composing new messages, replies, and
forwarded messages, as well as other font-related settings.
Signature. Use this group to specify an optional signature (block of data, usually text)
to include at the bottom of each outgoing message. Note that your mail server might
also append notifications to your outgoing messages automatically.
If you are interested to learn more about the mail format options, see Wiley™s Outlook 2003
Bible, Chapter 6.
Chapter 3 ¦ Configuring Outlook 2003 79


Summary
Before you can use Outlook to send and receive e-mail, you must add at least one e-mail
account to your profile. This chapter explained how to add the various types of e-mail
accounts supported by Outlook. The chapter also explained the function of personal folder
(PST) files and how to add them. Personal folder files store Outlook items and enable you to
organize your Outlook items, for example keeping old items in a set of archive folders.
This chapter also explained a variety of options you can configure in Outlook that control
the way Outlook handles e-mail, both for incoming and outgoing messages. Finally, the
chapter explained the purpose of Outlook profiles, how to create them, and how to use them
effectively.
¦ ¦ ¦
4
CHAPTER



Essential Excel
Worksheet
Operations . . . .

In This Chapter

Understanding Excel
worksheet essentials

T his chapter covers some essential information regarding
Controlling your views
worksheets. You™ll learn how to take control of your
worksheets so that you will be more efficient using the program.
Manipulating the rows
and columns
Learning the Fundamentals of Excel
. . . .
Worksheets
In Excel, each file is called a workbook, and each workbook can
contain one or more worksheets. You may find it helpful to think
of an Excel workbook as a notebook and worksheets as pages in
the notebook. As with a notebook, you can activate a particular
sheet, add new sheets, remove sheets, copy sheets, and so on.
The following sections describe the operations that you can
perform with worksheets.

Working with Excel™s windows
The files that Excel uses are known as workbooks. A workbook
can hold any number of sheets, and these sheets can be either
worksheets (a sheet consisting of rows and columns) or chart
sheets (a sheet that holds a single chart). A worksheet is what
people usually think of when they think of a spreadsheet. You can
open as many Excel workbooks as necessary at the same time.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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Figure 4-1 shows Excel with four workbooks open, each in a separate window. One of the
windows is minimized and appears near the lower-left corner of the screen. (When a work-
book is minimized, only its title bar is visible.) Worksheet windows can overlap, and the title
bar of one window is a different color. That™s the window that contains the active workbook.




Figure 4-1: You can open several Excel workbooks at the same time.

The workbook windows that Excel uses work much like the windows in any other Windows
program. Each window has three buttons at the right side of its title bar. From the left to right,
they are: Minimize, Maximize (or Restore), and Close. When a workbook window is maxi-
mized, the three buttons appear directly below Excel™s title bar.
Excel™s windows can be in one of the following states:
• Maximized: Fills Excel™s entire workspace. A maximized window does not have a
title bar, and the workbook™s name appears in Excel™s title bar. To maximize a
window, click its Maximize button.
• Minimized: Appears as a small window with only a title bar. To minimize a
window, click its Minimize button.
• Restored: A nonmaximized size. To restore a maximized or minimized window,
click its Restore button.
If you work with more than one workbook simultaneously (which is quite common), you
have to learn how to move, resize, and switch among the workbook windows.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 83


Moving and resizing windows
To move a window, make sure that it™s not maximized. Then click and drag its title bar with
your mouse.
To resize a window, click and drag any of its borders until it™s the size that you want it to
be. When you position the mouse pointer on a window™s border, the mouse pointer changes
to a double-sided arrow, which lets you know that you can now click and drag to resize the
window. To resize a window horizontally and vertically at the same time, click and drag
any of its corners.

You cannot move or resize a workbook window if it is maximized. You can move a minimized
Note
window, but doing so has no effect on its position when it is subsequently restored.

If you want all of your workbook windows to be visible (that is, not obscured by another
window), you can move and resize the windows manually, or you can let Excel do it for you.
The Window_Arrange command displays the Arrange Windows dialog box, as shown in
Figure 4-2. This dialog box has four window-arrangement options. Just select the one that
you want and click OK.




Figure 4-2: Use the Arrange Windows dialog box to quickly arrange all open workbook
windows.


Switching among windows
At any given time, one (and only one) workbook window is the active window. This is the
window that accepts your input, and it is the window on which your commands work. The
active window™s title bar is a different color, and the window appears at the top of the stack of
windows. To work in a different window, you need to make that window active. There are
several ways to make a different window the active workbook:
• Click another window, if it™s visible. The window you click moves to the top and
becomes the active window.
• Press Ctrl+Tab (or Ctrl+F6) to cycle through all open windows until the window that
you want to work with appears on top as the active window. Shift+Ctrl+Tab (or
Shift+Ctrl+F6) cycles through the windows in the opposite direction.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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• Click the workbook icon in the Windows Taskbar. If you don™t see workbook icons
in your Windows Taskbar, activate the Options dialog box, select the View tab, and
put a checkmark next to Windows in Taskbar.
• Click the Window menu and select the window that you want from the bottom part
of the pull-down menu (the active window has a check mark next to it). This menu
can display up to nine windows. If you have more than nine workbook windows
open, choose More Windows (which appears below the nine window names).

Most people prefer to do most of their work with maximized workbook windows. This enables
Tip
you to see more cells and eliminates the distraction of other workbook windows getting in the
way.

When you maximize one window, all the other windows are maximized, too (even though
you don™t see them). Therefore, if the active window is maximized and you activate a
different window, the new active window is also maximized. If the active workbook window
is maximized, you can™t select another window by clicking it (because other windows aren™t
visible). You must use either Ctrl+Tab, the Windows taskbar, or the Window menu to activate
another window.

You also can display a single workbook in more than one window. For example, if you have a
Tip workbook with two worksheets, you may want to display each worksheet in a separate window.
All the window-manipulation procedures described previously still apply. You use the
Window_New Window command to open a new window in the active workbook.

Closing windows
If you have multiple windows open, you may want to close those windows that you no longer
need. To close a window, select File_Close or simply click the Close button (the X icon) on
the worksheet window™s title bar. If the workbook window is maximized, its title bar is not
visible, so its Close button appears directly below Excel™s Close button
When you close a workbook window, Excel checks whether you have made any changes
since the last time you saved the file. If not, the window closes without a prompt from Excel.
If you™ve made any changes, Excel prompts you to save the file before it closes the window.

Making a worksheet the active sheet
At any given time, one workbook is the active workbook, and one sheet is the active sheet in
the active workbook. To activate a different sheet, just click its sheet tab, located at the
bottom of the workbook window. You also can use the following shortcut keys to activate a
different sheet:
• Ctrl+PgUp: Activates the previous sheet, if one exists
• Ctrl+PgDn: Activates the next sheet, if one exists
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 85

If your workbook has many sheets, all of its tabs may not be visible. You can use the tab-
scrolling buttons (see Figure 4-3) to scroll the sheet tabs. The sheet tabs share space with the
worksheet™s horizontal scrollbar. You also can drag the tab split box to display more or fewer
tabs. Dragging the tab split box simultaneously changes the number of tabs and the size of the
horizontal scrollbar.




Figure 4-3: Use the tab controls to activate a different worksheet or to see additional
worksheet tabs.


When you right-click any of the tab-scrolling buttons to the left of the worksheet tabs, Excel
Tip
displays a list of all sheets in the workbook. You can quickly activate a sheet by selecting it from
the list.


Adding a new worksheet to your workbook
Worksheets can be an excellent organizational tool. Instead of placing everything on a single
worksheet, you can use additional worksheets in a workbook to separate various workbook
elements logically. For example, if you have several products whose sales you track individu-
ally, you might want to assign each product to its own worksheet and then use another
worksheet to consolidate your results.
The following are three ways to add a new worksheet to a workbook:
• Select the Insert_Worksheet command.
• Press Shift+F11.
• Right-click a sheet tab, choose the Insert command from the shortcut menu, select
Worksheet from the Insert dialog box, and then click OK.
When you add a new worksheet to the workbook, Excel inserts the new worksheet before the
active worksheet, and the new worksheet becomes the active worksheet.

To insert more than one worksheet at a time, hold down the Shift key and click a range of
Tip
worksheet tabs. When you issue the command to insert a worksheet, Excel will add as many
worksheets as the number of worksheet tabs you selected before issuing the command.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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Deleting a worksheet you no longer need
If you no longer need a worksheet, or if you want to get rid of an empty worksheet in a
workbook, you can delete it in either of two ways:
• Select the Edit_Delete Sheet command.
• Right-click the sheet tab and choose the Delete command from the shortcut menu.
If the worksheet contains any data, Excel asks you to confirm that you want to delete the
sheet. If you have never used the worksheet, Excel deletes it immediately without asking for
confirmation.

You can delete multiple sheets with a single command by selecting the sheets that you want to
delete. To select multiple sheets, press Ctrl while you click the sheet tabs that you want to
Tip
delete. To select a group of contiguous sheets, click the first sheet tab, press Shift, and then
click the last sheet tab. Then use either method to delete the selected sheets.


When you delete a worksheet, it™s gone for good. This is one of the few operations in Excel that
Caution
can™t be undone.




Changing the Number of Sheets in Your Workbooks

By default, Excel automatically creates three worksheets in each new workbook. You can change
this default behavior. For example, I prefer to start each new workbook with a single worksheet.
After all, it™s easy enough to add new sheets if and when they are needed. To change the default
number of worksheets:
1. Select Tools_Options.
2. In the Options dialog box, click the General tab.
3. Change the value for the Sheets in New Workbook Setting and click OK.
Making this change will affect all new workbooks but will have no effect on existing workbooks.

Changing the name of a worksheet
The default names Excel uses for worksheets ” Sheet1, Sheet2, and so on ” aren™t very
descriptive. If you don™t change the worksheet names, it can be a bit hard to remember where
to find things in multiple-sheet workbooks. That™s why providing more meaningful names for
your worksheets is often a good idea.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 87

To change a sheet™s name, use any of the following methods to begin:
• Choose Format _Sheet_Rename.
• Double-click the sheet tab.
• Right-click the sheet tab and choose the Rename command from the shortcut menu.
After you have done one of the above actions, Excel highlights the name on the sheet tab so
that you can edit the name or replace it with a new name.

To edit the worksheet name rather than to replace it completely, it™s usually easiest to double-
Tip
click the sheet tab and then click within the name where you want to make a change.

Sheet names can be up to 31 characters, and spaces are allowed. However, you can™t use the
following characters in sheet names:
: colon
/ slash
\ backslash
? question mark
* asterisk
Keep in mind that a longer worksheet name results in a wider tab, which takes up more space
onscreen. Therefore, if you use lengthy sheet names, you won™t be able to see very many
sheet tabs without having to scroll the tab list.

Changing a sheet tab™s color
Excel allows you to change the color of one or more of your worksheet tabs. For example,
you may prefer to color-code the sheet tabs to make it easier to identify the worksheet™s
contents.
To change the color of a sheet tab, right-click the tab and choose Tab Color. Then select the
color in the Format Tab Color dialog box.

Rearranging your worksheets
You may want to rearrange the order of worksheets in a workbook. If you have a separate
worksheet for each sales region, for example, arranging the worksheets in alphabetical order
or by total sales might be helpful. You may want to move a worksheet from one workbook to
another. (To move a worksheet to a different workbook, both workbooks must be open.) You
can also create copies of worksheets.
You can move or copy a worksheet in the following ways:
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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• Select the Edit_Move or Copy Sheet command to display the Move or Copy
dialog box.
• Right-click the sheet tab and select the Move or Copy command. (This also displays
the same Move or Copy dialog box.)
• To move a worksheet, click the worksheet tab and drag it to its desired location
(either in the same workbook or in a different workbook) to move the worksheet.
When you drag, the mouse pointer changes to a small sheet, and a small arrow
guides you.
• To copy a worksheet, click the worksheet tab, press Ctrl, and drag the tab to its
desired location (either in the same workbook or in a different workbook). When
you drag, the mouse pointer changes to a small sheet with a plus sign on it.

You can move or copy multiple sheets simultaneously. First select the sheets by clicking their
Tip
sheet tabs while holding down the Ctrl key. Then you can move or copy the set of sheets by
using the methods just described.

Dragging is usually the easiest method, but if the workbook has many sheets, you may prefer
to use the Move or Copy dialog box. This dialog box is shown in Figure 4-4, and it enables
you to select the workbook and the new location.




Figure 4-4: Use the Move or Copy dialog box to move or copy worksheets in the same or
another workbook.

If you move or copy a worksheet to a workbook that already has a sheet with the same name,
Excel changes the name to make it unique. For example, Sheet1 becomes Sheet1 (2).

When you move or copy a worksheet to a different workbook, any defined names and custom
Note
formats also get copied to the new workbook.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 89


Hiding and unhiding a worksheet
In some situations, you may want to hide one or more worksheets. Hiding a sheet may be
useful if you don™t want others to see it, or if you just want to get it out of the way. When a
sheet is hidden, its sheet tab is also hidden. At least one sheet must remain visible. (You can™t
hide all the sheets in a workbook.)
To hide a worksheet, choose Format_Sheet_Hide. The active worksheet (or selected
worksheets) will be hidden from view.
To unhide a hidden worksheet, choose Format _Sheet_Unhide. Excel opens its Unhide
dialog box that lists all hidden sheets. Choose the sheet that you want to redisplay and click
OK. You can™t select multiple sheets from this dialog box, so you need to repeat the com-
mand for each sheet that you want to redisplay.

To more fully protect a workbook from unauthorized changes, use the Tools_Protection menu
commands. These commands give you several options in deciding how much access other
Tip
users will have to the worksheets in your workbooks. Be aware that this is a very weak security
measure. It is relatively easy to crack Excel™s protection features.



Making a Sheet Very Hidden
It™s also possible to make a sheet “very hidden.” A sheet that is very hidden does not appear in the
Unhide dialog box. To make a sheet very hidden:
1. Activate the worksheet.
2. Select View_Toolbars_Control Toolbox. This displays the Control Toolbox toolbar.
3. Click the Properties button on the Control Toolbox toolbar. This displays the Properties box,
shown in the following figure.
4. In the Properties box, select the Visible option, and choose 2 - xlSheetVeryHidden.




Continued
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
90


Continued
After performing these steps, the worksheet will be hidden, and it will not appear in the Unhide
dialog box.
Be careful. After you make a sheet very hidden, you can™t use the Properties box to unhide it
because you won™t be able to select the sheet! In fact, the only way to unhide such a sheet is to use
a VBA macro. (See Part VI for more information about VBA.) This VBA statement will unhide Sheet1
in the active workbook:
ActiveWorkbook.Worksheets(“Sheet1”).Visible = True


Controlling the Worksheet View
As you add more information to a worksheet, you may find that it gets more difficult to
navigate and locate what you want. Excel includes a few options that enable you to view your
sheet, and sometimes multiple sheets, more efficiently. This section discusses a few additional
worksheet options at your disposal.

Viewing a worksheet in multiple windows
Sometimes, you may want to view two different parts of a worksheet simultaneously ”
perhaps to make it easier to reference a distant cell in a formula. Or you may want to
examine more than one sheet in the same workbook simultaneously. You can accomplish
either of these actions by opening a new view to the workbook, using one or more
additional windows.
To create and display a new view of the active workbook, choose Window_New Window.

If the workbook is maximized when you create a new window, you may not even notice that
Tip
Excel has created the new window; but if you look at the Excel title bar, you™ll see that the
workbook title now has :2 appended to the name. Select Window_Arrange and choose one
of the options in the Arrange Windows dialog box to display the open windows.

Excel displays a new window for the active workbook, similar to the one shown in Figure 4-
5. In this case, each window shows a different worksheet in the workbook. Notice the text in
the windows™ title bars: climate data.xls:1 and climate data.xls:2. To help
you keep track of the windows, Excel appends a colon and a number to each window.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 91




Figure 4-5: Use multiple windows to view different sections of the workbook at the same
time.

A single workbook can have as many views (that is, separate windows) as you want. Each
window is independent of the others. In other words, scrolling to a new location in one
window doesn™t cause scrolling in the other window(s).
You can close these additional windows when you no longer need them. For example,
clicking the Close button on the active window™s title bar closes the active window but
doesn™t close the other windows.

Multiple windows make it easier to copy information from one worksheet to another. You can
Tip
use Excel™s drag-and-drop procedures to do this. In addition, multiple windows are useful when
examining formulas.


Comparing sheets side by side
New
The Compare Side by Side feature is new to Excel 2003.
Feature

In some situations, you may want to compare two worksheets that are in different windows.
A new feature in Excel 2003 makes this task a bit easier. The sheets can be in the same
workbook or in different workbooks.
First, make sure that the two sheets are displayed in separate windows. If you want to
compare two sheets in the same workbook, use the Window_New Window command to
create a new window for the active workbook. Activate the first window; then choose
Window_Compare Side by Side With. If more than two windows are open, you™ll see a
dialog box that lets you select the window for the comparison.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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The two windows will be tiled horizontally, not really “side by side.” If you prefer a true
side-by-side arrangement, select Window_Arrange, and select Vertical in the Arrange
Windows dialog box.
When using the Compare Side by Side feature, you™ll find that scrolling in one of the
windows also scrolls the other window. When you use this command, the Compare Side by
Side toolbar is displayed. This toolbar contains the following buttons:
• Synchronous Scrolling: Toggles automatic windows scrolling on and off.
• Reset Window Position: If you have rearranged or moved the windows, clicking
this button puts them back in the initial horizontal arrangement.
• Close Side by Side: Breaks out of side-by-side mode and returns to the previous
window positions. You can also use the Window_Break Side by Side command
for this.
Keep in mind that this feature is for manual comparison only. Unfortunately, Excel does not
provide a way to show you the differences between two sheets.

Splitting the worksheet window into panes
If you prefer not to clutter your screen with additional windows, Excel provides another
option for viewing multiple parts of the same worksheet. The Window_Split command
splits the active worksheet into two or four separate panes. The split occurs at the location
of the cell pointer. You can use the mouse to drag the individual panes to resize them.
Figure 4-6 shows a worksheet split into two panes. Notice that row numbers aren™t
continuous. In other words, splitting panes enables you to display in a single window
widely separated areas of a worksheet. To remove the split panes, choose
Window_Remove Split.




Figure 4-6: You can also split the worksheet window to view different areas of the
worksheet at the same time.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 93

Another way to split and unsplit panes is to drag either the vertical or horizontal split bar.
These bars are the small rectangles that normally appear just above the top of the vertical
scrollbar and just to the right of the horizontal scrollbar. When you move the mouse pointer
over a split bar, the mouse pointer changes to a pair of parallel lines with arrows pointing
outward from each line. To remove split panes by using the mouse, drag the pane separator all
the way to the edge of the window or just double-click it.

Keeping the titles in view by freezing panes
If you set up a worksheet with row or column headings, it™s easy to lose track of just where
you are when you scroll to a different location in the worksheet. Excel provides a handy
solution to this problem: freezing panes. This keeps the headings visible while you are
scrolling through the worksheet.
To freeze panes, start by moving the cell pointer to the cell below the row that you want to
remain visible as you scroll and to the right of the column that you want to remain visible as
you scroll. Then, select Window_Freeze Panes. Excel inserts dark lines to indicate the frozen
rows and columns. You™ll find that the frozen row and column remain visible as you scroll
throughout the worksheet. To remove the frozen panes, select Window_Unfreeze Panes.
Figure 4-7 shows a worksheet with frozen panes. In this case, rows 1:3 and column A are
frozen in place. This allows you to scroll down and to the right to locate some information
while keeping the column titles and the column A entries visible.




Figure 4-7: By freezing certain columns and rows, they remain visible while you scroll
the worksheet.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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If you press Ctrl+Home while the worksheet has frozen panes, the cell selector moves to the
Tip
top-left unfrozen cell. You can move into the frozen rows or columns by using the direction keys
or your mouse.


Zooming in or out for a better view
Excel enables you to zoom in or out to scale the size of your worksheets. Normally,
everything you see onscreen is displayed at 100 percent. You can change the zoom
percentage from 10 percent (very tiny) to 400 percent (huge). Using a small zoom
percentage can help you to get a bird™s-eye view of your worksheet to see how it™s laid
out. Zooming in is useful if your eyesight isn™t quite what it used to be and you have
trouble deciphering tiny type. Figure 4-8 shows a window zoomed to 10 percent and a
window zoomed to 400 percent.




Figure 4-8: You can zoom in or out for a better view of your worksheets.

You can easily change the zoom factor of the active worksheet by using the Zoom tool on the
Standard toolbar. Just click the arrow and select the desired zoom factor. Your screen trans-
forms immediately. You can also type a zoom percentage directly into the Zoom tool. If you
choose Selection from the drop-down list, Excel zooms the worksheet to display only the
selected cells (useful if you want to view only a particular range).

Zooming affects only the active worksheet, so you can use different zoom factors for different
Tip
worksheets. Also, if you have a worksheet displayed in two different windows, you can set a
different zoom factor for each of the windows.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 95


If your worksheet uses named ranges, you™ll find that zooming your worksheet to 39 percent or
Tip
less displays the name of the range overlaid on the cells. This is useful for getting an overview
of how a worksheet is laid out.

You can also set the zoom percentage by using the View_Zoom command. This command
displays the Zoom dialog box, where you can select an option or enter a value between 10
and 400.

In some situations, using a zoom factor other than 100 may cause some strange display prob-
Caution
lems with Excel, especially if charts and graphics are used. If you experience any odd display
problems, setting the zoom factor is 100 may fix it.


Saving your view settings
If you create a number of different worksheet views for different purposes, you may want to
save those view settings so that you can easily recall them without going through all of the
necessary setup steps each time you want to use the same view. To save your view settings,
create a named view.
A named view includes settings for window size and position, frozen panes or titles, outlin-
ing, zoom factor, the active cell, print area, and many of the settings in the Options dialog
box. A named view can also include hidden print settings and hidden rows and columns. If
you find that you™re constantly fiddling with these settings and then changing them back,
using named views can save you lots of effort.
To create a named view, begin by setting up the view settings the way you want them (for
example, hide some columns). Then select View_Custom Views to display the Custom
Views dialog box. Click the Add button and provide a name in the Add View dialog box that
appears (see Figure 4-9). You can also specify what to include in the view by using the two
check boxes. Click OK to save the named view.




Figure 4-9: Use the Add View dialog box to create a named view.

The Custom Views dialog box displays a list of all named views. To select a particular view,
just select it from the list and click the Show button. To delete a named view from the list,
click the Delete button.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
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Monitoring cells with a Watch Window
In some situations, you may want to keep track of the value in a particular cell. As you
scroll throughout the worksheet, that cell may disappear from view. Using a Watch Win-
dow can help.
The Watch Window is actually a special type of toolbar. To display the Watch Window
toolbar, choose View_Toolbars_Watch Window. Then click Add Watch and specify the cell
that you want to watch. The Watch Window will display the value in that cell. You can add
any number of cells to the Watch Window, and you can move the toolbar to a convenient
location. Figure 4-10 shows the Watch Window monitoring two cells.




Figure 4-10: Use the Watch Window toolbar to monitor the value in one or more cells.



Working with Rows and Columns
This section discusses some worksheet operations that involve rows and columns. Rows
and columns make up an Excel worksheet. Every worksheet has exactly 65,536 rows and
256 columns.

One of the most commonly asked questions about Excel is How can I increase the number of
rows and columns? Unfortunately, there is no way to do it. The number of rows and columns is
Note
fixed, and you can™t change them.


Inserting rows and columns
Although the number of rows and columns in a worksheet is fixed, you can still insert and
delete rows and columns if you need to make room for additional information ” perhaps to
include additional items in a calculation, for example. These operations don™t change the
number of rows or columns. Rather, inserting a new row moves down the other rows to
accommodate the new row. The last row is simply removed from the worksheet if it is
empty. Inserting a new column shifts the columns to the right, and the last column is
removed if it™s empty.

If the last row (row 65,536) is not empty, you can™t insert a new row. Similarly, if the last column
(column IV) contains information, Excel won™t let you insert a new column. Attempting to add a
Note
row or column displays the dialog box shown in Figure 4-11.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 97




Figure 4-11: You can™t add a new row or column if doing so would move nonblank cells
off the worksheet.

To insert a new row or rows, you can use any of the following techniques:
¦ Select an entire row or multiple rows by clicking the row numbers in the worksheet
border. Select the Insert_Rows command.
¦ Select an entire row or multiple rows by clicking the row numbers in the worksheet
border. Right-click and choose Insert from the shortcut menu.
¦ Move the cell pointer to the row that you want to insert and then select
Insert_Rows. If you select multiple cells in the column, Excel inserts additional
rows that correspond to the number of cells selected in the column and moves the
rows below the insertion down.
The procedure for inserting a new column or columns is similar, but you use the
Insert_Column command.
You also can insert cells, rather than just rows or columns. Select the range into which you
want to add new cells and then select Insert_Cells (or right-click the selection and choose
Insert). To insert cells, the other cells must be shifted to the right or shifted down. Therefore,
Excel displays the Insert dialog box shown in Figure 4-12 to learn the direction in which you
want to shift the cells.




Figure 4-12: You can insert partial rows or columns by using the Insert dialog box.


Deleting rows and columns
You may also find that it™s necessary to delete rows or columns in a worksheet. For example,
your sheet may contain old data that is no longer needed.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
98

To delete a row or rows, use any of the following methods:
• Select an entire row or multiple rows by clicking the row numbers in the worksheet
border and then select Edit_Delete.
• Select an entire row or multiple rows by clicking the row numbers in the worksheet
border. Right-click and choose Delete from the shortcut menu.
• Move the cell pointer to the row that you want to delete and then select
Edit_Delete. In the dialog box that appears, choose the Entire row option. If you
select multiple cells in the column, Excel deletes all selected rows.
Deleting columns works in a similar way. If you discover that you accidentally deleted a row
or column, select Edit_Undo (or Ctrl+Z) to undo the action.

Hiding rows and columns
If necessary, you can hide rows and columns. This may be useful if you don™t want users to
see particular information or if you need to print a report that summarizes the information in
the worksheet without showing all the details.
To hide rows or columns in your worksheet, select the row or rows that you want to hide and
then choose Format_Row_Hide. Or select the column or columns that you want to hide and
then choose Format_Column_Hide.

You also can drag the row or column™s border to hide the row or column. You must drag the
Tip
border in the row or column heading. Drag the bottom border of a row upward or the border of
a column to the left.

A hidden row is actually a row with its height set to zero. Similarly, a hidden column has a
column width of zero. When you use the arrow keys to move the cell pointer, cells in hidden
rows or columns are skipped. In other words, you can™t use the arrow keys to move to a cell
in a hidden row or column.
Unhiding a hidden row or column can be a bit tricky because selecting a row or column that™s
hidden is difficult. The solution is to select the columns or rows that are adjacent to the hidden
column or row. (Select at least one column or row on either side.) Then select
Format_Row_Unhide or Format_Column_Unhide. Another method is to select Edit_Go
To (or its F5 equivalent) to select a cell in a hidden row or column. For example, if column A is
hidden, you can press F5 and specify cell A1 (or any other cell in column A) to move the cell
pointer to the hidden column. Then you can use the appropriate command to unhide the column.

Changing column widths and row heights
Often, you™ll want to change the width of a column or the height of a row. For example, you
can make columns narrower to accommodate more information on a printed page. Or you
may want to increase row height to create a “double spaced” effect.
Excel provides several different ways to change the widths of columns and the height of rows.
Chapter 4 ¦ Essential Excel Worksheet Operations 99


Changing column widths
Column width is measured in terms of the number of characters of a fixed pitch font that will fit
into the cell™s width. By default, each column™s width is 8.43 characters. This is actually a rather
meaningless measurement because most of the fonts you will use are proportional fonts ” the
width of individual characters varies; for example, the letter i is much narrower than the letter W.

Tip If hash symbols (#) fill a cell that contains a numerical value, the column isn™t wide enough to
accommodate the information in the cell. Widen the column to solve the problem.

Before you change the width, you can select multiple columns, so that the width will be the
same for all selected columns. To select multiple columns, either click and drag in the column
border or press Ctrl while you select individual columns. To select all columns, click the
Select All button in the upper-left corner of the worksheet border (or press Ctrl+A). You can
change columns widths by using any of the following techniques.
• Drag the right-column border with the mouse until the column is the desired width.
• Choose Format_Column_Width and enter a value in the Column Width dialog box.
• Choose Format_Column_AutoFit Selection. This adjusts the width of the selected
column so that the widest entry in the column fits. If you want, you can just select cells
in the column, and the column is adjusted based on the widest entry in your selection.
• Double-click the right border of a column header to set the column width automati-
cally to the widest entry in the column.

To change the default width of all columns, use the Format_Column_Standard Width com-
Tip
mand. This displays a dialog box into which you enter the new default column width. All col-
umns that haven™t been previously adjusted take on the new column width.


After you manually adjust a column™s width, Excel will no longer automatically adjust the column
Caution
to accommodate longer numerical entries.

Changing row heights
Row height is measured in points (a standard unit of measurement in the printing trade ” 72
points is equal to 1 inch). The default row height depends on the font defined in the Normal
style. Excel adjusts row heights automatically to accommodate the tallest font in the row. So,
if you change the font size of a cell to 20 points, for example, Excel makes the column taller
so that the entire text is visible.
You can set the row height manually, however, by using any of the following techniques. As
with columns, you can select multiple rows.
¦ Drag the lower row border with the mouse until the row is the desired height.
¦ Choose Format_Row_Height and enter a value (in points) in the Row Height
dialog box.
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
100

¦ Double-click the bottom border of a row to set the row height automatically to the
tallest entry in the row. You also can use the Format_Row_AutoFit command
for this.
Changing the row height is useful for spacing out rows and is almost always preferable to
inserting empty rows between lines of data.


Summary
This chapter covered the basic spreadsheet operations to get you functional with Microsoft
Office Excel 2003. You also learned some of the new features in Excel 2003, such as the side
by side feature.
¦ Remember that Excel functions much the same way a binder does; you can add or
delete worksheets, move one to the “top,” etc. You interact with the different sheets
by using the tabs at the bottom left of the page and by using the typical Microsoft
functions for restore, minimize, etc.
¦ To create and display a new view of the active workbook, choose Window_New
Window.
¦ If you want to compare two sheets in the same workbook, use the Window_New
Window command to create a new window for the active workbook. Activate the
first window; then choose Window_Compare Side by Side With.
¦ Excel provides another option for viewing multiple parts of the same worksheet. The
Window_Split command splits the active worksheet into two or four separate panes.
¦ To remove the split panes, choose Window_Remove Split.
¦ A named view includes settings for window size and position, frozen panes or titles,
outlining, zoom factor, the active cell, print area, and many of the settings in the
Options dialog box. To create a named view, begin by setting up the view settings
the way you want them (for example, hide some columns). Then select
View_Custom Views to display the Custom Views dialog box. Click the Add
button and provide a name in the Add View dialog box.
¦ You can add or delete rows or columns from your spreadsheet using one of
several methods: Selecting the row/column and right clicking your mouse and
making the appropriate selection, or using the Edit menu for deleting and the
Insert menu for adding.
¦ To hide rows or columns in your worksheet, select the row or rows that you want to
hide and then choose Format_Row_Hide. Or select the column or columns that you
want to hide and then choose Format_Column_Hide.
¦ You can also change the width and/or height of columns or rows, using one of the four
methods discussed within the chapter.
¦ ¦ ¦
5
CHAPTER


Developing
Your
PowerPoint . . . .

In This Chapter

Action Plan Identifying your
audience and purpose

Choosing an appropriate
presentation method

Planning the visual
image to convey

C an you guess what the single biggest problem is when most
people use PowerPoint? Here™s a hint: It™s not a problem Deciding whether to use
with the software at all. It™s that they don™t think things through multimedia effects
carefully before they create their presentation, and then they
have to go back and make major modifications later. You™ve Deciding whether
probably heard the saying, “If you don™t have time to do it right, handouts are
how are you going to find time to do it over?” This sentiment is appropriate
certainly applicable to creating presentations.
Planning your rehearsal
This chapter outlines an 11-point strategy for creating the
times and methods
appropriate PowerPoint presentation right from the start. By
considering the issues addressed here, you can avoid making
. . . .
false assumptions about your audience and their needs and
avoid creating a beautiful presentation with some horrible flaw
that makes it unusable. Spend a half hour or so in this chapter
and you can save yourself literally days in rework later.


Step 1: Identifying Your Audience
and Purpose
Before you can think about the presentation you need to create,
you must first think of your audience. Different audiences respond
to different presentation types, as you probably already know from
real-life experience. A sales pitch to a client requires a very
different approach than an informational briefing to your
coworkers. Ask yourself these questions:
Part I ¦ Getting Functional with Office 2003
102

¦ How many people will be attending the presentation? The attendance makes
a difference because the larger the group, the larger your screen needs to be so
that everyone can see. If you don™t have access to a large screen, you have to
make the lettering and charts big and chunky so that everyone can read your
presentation.
¦ What is the average age of the attendees? Although it™s difficult to generalize
about people, it™s especially important to keep your presentation light and entertain-
ing when you™re presenting to a very young audience (teens and children). Gener-
ally speaking, the older the audience, the more authoritative you need to be.
¦ What role will the audience take in relation to the topic? If you are rolling
out a new product or system, the managerial staff will likely want a general
overview of it, but the line workers who will actually be operating the product
need lots of details. Generally speaking, the higher the level of managers, the
more removed they will be from the action, and the fewer details of operation
they need.
¦ How well does the audience already know the topic? If you are presenting to a
group that knows nothing about your topic, you want to keep things basic and
make sure that you define all the unfamiliar terms. In contrast, with a group of
experts you are likely to have many follow-up questions after the main presenta-
tion, so you should plan on having some hidden backup slides ready in anticipa-
tion of those questions.
¦ Does the audience care about the topic? If the topic is personally important to
the attendees (such as information on their insurance benefits or vacation sched-
ule), they will likely pay attention even if your presentation is plain and straight-
forward. If you must win them over, however, you need to spend more time on
the bells and whistles.
¦ Are the attendees prejudiced either positively or negatively toward the topic?
Keeping in mind the audience™s preconceived ideas can make the difference between
success and failure in some presentations. For example, knowing that a client hates
sales pitches can help you tailor your own to be out of the ordinary.
¦ Are the attendees in a hurry? Do your attendees have all afternoon to listen to you,
or do they need to get back to their regular jobs? Nothing is more frustrating than
sitting through a leisurely presentation when you™re watching precious minutes tick
away. Know your audience™s schedule and their preference for quick versus thor-
ough coverage.
Next, think about what you want the outcome of the presentation to be. You might want more
than one outcome, but try to identify the primary one as your main goal. Some outcomes to
consider include the following:
¦ Audience feels good about the topic. Some presentations are strictly
cheerleading sessions, designed to sway the audience™s opinion. Don™t discount
this objective ” it™s a perfectly legitimate reason to make a presentation! For
example, suppose a new management staff has taken over a factory. The new
Chapter 5 ¦ Developing Your PowerPoint Action Plan 103

management team might want to reassure the workers that everything is going to
be okay. A feel-good, Welcome to the Team presentation, complete with gim-
micks like company T-shirts or hats, can go a long way in this regard.
¦ Audience is informed. Sometimes you need to convey information to a group of
people and no decision is involved on their part. For example, suppose your
company has switched insurance carriers and you want to let all the employees
know about their new benefits. An informational presentation can cover most of
the common questions and save your human resources people lots of time in
answering the same questions over and over.
¦ Audience members make individual decisions. This presentation is a kind of
sales pitch in which you are pitching an idea or product to a group but each
person says yes or no individually. For example, suppose you are selling time-
share vacation condos. You may give a presentation to a group of 100 in an
attempt to sell your package to at least a few of the group.
This presentation type can also have an informational flavor; you are informing
people about their choices without pushing one choice or the other. For example,

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