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Janette Dillon™s Language and Stage in Medieval and Renaissance England
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998). Dillon frames the chapter
with a reading of The Spanish Tragedy, and includes a signi¬cant section on
Henry V. She also makes some interesting observations about Three Ladies
and Englishmen for My Money. Her balanced historical overview is also useful.
However, her use of ˜racist™ to describe English prejudice against European
languages and their import (e.g. pp. 164, 167, 176) allows her to elide English“
European con¬‚ict and the English colonial experience of distant others (e.g.
p. 176) a little too easily.
20 Hoenselaars, Images of Englishmen, p. 58.
21 Dillon notes the strategic use of English characters™ ˜failure™ to speak foreign
languages as part of an oppressive, co-opting (or colonizing) system that
controls the alien. See Dillon, Language and Stage, pp. 169, 182.
22 See Teresa Nugent, ˜Usury and Counterfeiting in Wilson™s The Three Ladies
of London and The Three Lords and Three Ladies of London, and in
Shakespeare™s Measure for Measure™, in Money and the Age of Shakespeare, ed.
Linda Woodbridge (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2003), pp. 201“17,
pp. 203“4, 207“8, 213.
23 Firk™s line to the injured Ralph, ˜Thou lie with a woman, to build nothing
but Cripplegates!™ (14.67) could be compared. In this case, the vaguer alien
Notes to pages 127“131
178
reference seems to be to the return of soldiers from wars, forced to beg and
burden society.
24 Emma Smith sees such assertive power as an inherited and gendered
national trait: ˜In his play, Haughton has killed off the mother but not her
tongue: Pisaro™s wife had given her language, and with it her national status,
to her daughters™ (˜“So much English by the Mother”: Gender, Foreigners,
and the Mother Tongue in William Haughton™s Englishmen for My Money™,
Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 13 (2001): 165“81, p. 176).
25 Edmund Valentine Campos, ˜Jews, Spaniards, and Portingales: Ambiguous
Identities of Portuguese Marranos in Elizabethan England™, ELH 69 (2002):
599“616, p. 613.
26 Diane Cady, ˜Linguistic Dis-ease: Foreign Language as Sexual Disease in
Early Modern England™, in Sins of the Flesh: Responding to Sexual Disease in
Early Modern Europe, ed. Kevin Siena (Toronto: Center for Reformation and
Renaissance Studies, 2005), pp. 159“86, pp. 179, 161.
27 Leinwand, The City Staged; Jean Howard, Theater of a City: the Places of
London Comedy, 1598“1642 (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press,
2007).
28 I do not agree with Angela Stock, who argues that elements of London
description are brought into the play as a satirical response to the (just about
to be) published Survey of London by John Stow. See ˜Stow™s Survey and the
London Playwrights™, in John Stow and the Making of the English Past, eds.
Ian Gadd and Alexandra Gillespie (London: British Library, 2004), pp. 89“98.
29 Thomas Nashe, The Works of Thomas Nashe, 5 vols., ed. Ronald B.
McKerrow (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1966), 2, p. 312. The middle of the
seventeenth century sees the publication of Thomas Browne™s Pseudodoxia
Epidemica. In Chap. 10, Browne dismisses the theory of a ˜Jewish smell™, since
the Jews are not a racially distinct group, but intermingled with others; since
they eat more carefully than other people; and since the smell is not evident
in the synagogues. The theory arose, Browne supposes, from the literalizing
of the metaphorical assertion that the Jews™ antipathy to Christians ˜made
them abominable and stinck in the nostrils of all men™, and Jacob™s comment
that his sons™ abomination had made him ˜stinke in the land™ (Gen. 24)
(Sir Thomas Browne™ s Pseudodoxia Epidemica, ed. Robin Robbins, 2 vols.
(1646; Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1981), 1, pp. 324“9).
30 Andrew Gurr, ˜The Bare Island™, Shakespeare Survey 47 (1994): 29“43, p. 36.
31 In his edition of the play, A. C. Baugh identified the conduit at the junction
of Leadenhall and Cornhill streets as the one referred to in this instant
(William Haughton, Englishmen for My Money, ed. Albert Croll Baugh
(Ph.D. Diss., University of Pennsylvania, 1917), p. 226). John Stow writes that
a forcier conveyed Thames water through the main pipe, which ˜with foure
spoutes did at every tyde runne (according to covenant) foure wayes, plen-
tifully serving to the commoditie of the inhabitants neare adjoyning in their
houses, and also cleansed the Chanels of the streete towarde Bishopsgate,
Aldgate, the bridge, and the Stocks Market™ (A Survey of London, 2 vols., ed.
Notes to pages 132“136 179
C. L. Kingsford (1599 and 1603; Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1908), 1, p. 188).
Stow also notes that the highly bene¬cial conduit was built by one Peter
Morris, a German, in 1582.
32 John Orrell, ˜The Architecture of the Fortune Playhouse™, Shakespeare Survey
47 (1994): 15“27, pp. 23“6. A combination of the Greek derivative ˜Herm™,
from the god of passing-over, Hermes, and the Roman ˜Term™, from
terminus, or boundary, gives us a richly suggestive etymological and semiotic
context in which to think about the trope of foreigners being kept within
limits by hitting their heads on the posts, while being directed to cross over
the boundary of the city in the ¬ction of the play, while in reality heading for
the groundling audience at the limit of the stage. Orrell points out the con-
tinuation of the iconography of Terms in frontispiece engravings (illus., p. 25).
33 Christopher Marlowe, Edward II, eds. Martin Wiggins and Robert Lindsey (New
Mermaids) (London: A & C Black, 1997), 5.4.31; Nashe, The Works, 2, p. 298.
34 The term ˜Bridewell-bird™ was current in the 1580s and 1590s (OED
˜Bridewell™). Shapiro notes that, in response to the Dutch church libel, the
Privy Council ˜not only ordered a search and apprehension of those suspected
of writing the poem, but sanctioned the use of torture at Bridewell prison™,
presumably to make the inmates ˜sing™ (Shakespeare and the Jews, p. 184).
35 Fleck, ˜Marking Difference™, pp. 352“3.
36 Janette Dillon points out that Henry V does a similar job of censuring
hierarchical contravention when it has Williams complain that he only talked
to the king as brashly as he did because the king was not in his proper place;
had the king in fact been a commoner, Williams would have committed no
offence (see Language and Stage, p. 181).
37 Ronda A. Arab, ˜Work, Bodies, and Gender in The Shoemaker™ s Holiday™,
Medieval and Renaissance Drama in England 13 (2001): 182“212, pp. 184“8.
38 Jonathan Gil Harris and Natasha Korda discuss this shift in the medieval and
early modern senses of ˜property™ in their Introduction to Staged Properties in
Early Modern English Drama., eds. Jonathan Gil Harris and Natasha Korda
(Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002).
39 Line references are to Anthony Parr™s New Mermaids edition of the play, 2nd
edn (London: A & C Black, 1990).
40 Alexander Leggatt for one notices the play™s ˜deliberate suppression of
material™ found in Deloney™s source text The Gentle Craft on this issue; see
Citizen Comedy in the Age of Shakespeare (Toronto: University of Toronto
Press, 1973), p. 18.
41 Silk weaving was a very prominent resident alien occupation in late-sixteenth-
century London. The Ellesmere MS version of the 1593 return of strangers
records 219 alien silk weavers in the Metropolis plus 136 in other silk-
production jobs (355 total), out of 704 alien workers in all clothing and cloth
jobs. By comparison, there were only 66 shoemakers, 20 cobblers, 6 bakers, 85
brewers, and 158 merchants in the return. After our period, in the 1635 return,
only 12 aliens were listed as silk weavers among 609 weavers in general (Irene
Scouloudi, Returns of Strangers in the Metropolis 1593, 1627, 1635, 1639: a Study of an
Notes to pages 136“138
180
Active Minority (London: Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland,
1985), pp. 131, 133. See also Lien Luu™s chapter on the silk industry in Immigrants
and the Industries of London 1500“1700 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2005), pp. 175“217.
42 Jean MacIntyre thinks that Eyre displays ˜an egalitarian indifference to
garments that display a man™s rank. This contrasts him with his wife,
Margery, for whom a French hood, a periwig, and a farthingale are the
purpose of promotion to office™ (˜Shore™s Wife and The Shoemaker™ s
Holiday™, Cahiers Elisabethains 12 (1991): 17“28, p. 22). In fact, as the
quotation in the main text makes clear, it is Eyre who gives Margery the
French hood with some pride. Eyre loves the ˜idea™ of his new apparel and
understands its social importance.
43 Robert Tittler, Architecture and Power: the Town Hall and the English Urban
Community (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991), esp. Chap. 5, ˜Oligarchy,
Deference, and the Built Environment™; see also Tittler, ˜The End of the
Middle Ages in the English Country Town™, Sixteenth Century Journal 4
(1987): 471“87.
44 In addition to Ann Rosalind Jones and Peter Stallybrass, Renaissance Clothing
and the Materials of Memory (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press,
2000), earlier work addresses other aspects of stage apparel: see Peter Hyland,
˜Disguise and Renaissance Tragedy™, University of Toronto Quarterly 55
(1985“6): 161“71; Muriel Bradbrook, ˜Shakespeare and the Use of Disguise in
Elizabethan Drama™, Essays in Criticism 2 (1952): 159“68; and Victor
O. Freeburg™s traditional Disguise Plots in Elizabethan Drama: a Study in
Stage Tradition (1915; New York: Benjamin Blom, 1965). Roze Hentschell™s
essay ˜Treasonous Textiles: Foreign Cloth and the Construction of English-
ness™, Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 32 (2002): 543“70, usefully
discusses the role of clothing as a marker of nationality.
45 Jonathan Gil Harris, ˜Properties of Skill: Product Placement in Early English
Artisanal Drama™, in Staged Properties in Early Modern English Drama, eds.
Harris and Korda, pp. 35“66, p. 54.
46 Julia Gasper, The Dragon and the Dove: the Plays of Thomas Dekker (Oxford:
Clarendon Press, 1990), p. 19.
47 Gasper, The Dragon and the Dove, p. 20.
48 Gasper, The Dragon and the Dove, p. 19.
49 Joseph P. Ward, ˜Fictitious Shoemakers, Agitated Weavers and the Limits of
Popular Xenophobia in Elizabethan London™, in From Strangers to Citizens:
the Integration of Immigrant Communities in Britain, Ireland, and Colonial
America, 1550“1750, eds. Randolph Vigne and Charles Littleton (London:
Huguenot Society of Great Britain and Ireland, 2001), pp. 80“7, p. 85.
50 See Thomas Dekker, The Shoemaker™ s Holiday, in Drama of the English
Renaissance i: the Tudor Period, eds. Russell A. Fraser and Norman Rabkin
(New York: Macmillan, 1976), i .iv.52 n., p. 489.
51 These points are made by McCluskey, ˜ “Shall I betray my brother?” ™, pp. 44
and 49, and Andrew Fleck, ˜Marking Difference™, p. 363.
52 McCluskey, ˜“Shall I betray my brother?”™, p. 49.
Notes to pages 139“146 181
53 Gerald Porter, ˜Cobblers All: Occupation as Identity and Cultural Message™,
Folk Music Journal 7 (1995): 43“61, p. 46.
54 L. D. Timms, ˜Dekker™s The Shoemaker™ s Holiday and Elizabeth™s Accession
Day™, Notes and Queries 230 (1985): 58.
55 Scouloudi, Returns of Strangers, p. 24.
56 Between these two uses of ˜Roland™, Eyre turns to his wife and scolds her
suggestion that he get rid of ˜Hans™: ˜Why, my sweet Lady Madgy, think you
Simon Eyre can forget his fine Dutch journeyman? No, vah! Fie, I scorn it! It
shall never be cast in my teeth that I was unthankful. Lady Madgy, thou hadst
never covered thy Saracen™s head with this French flap, nor loaden thy bum
with this farthingale “ ™tis trash, trumpery, vanity! “ Simon Eyre had never
walked in a red petticoat, nor wore a chain of gold, but for my fine
journeyman™s portagues; and shall I leave him? No. Prince am I none, yet
bear a princely mind™ (17.12“20). It is interesting that Eyre™s everyday dis-
course takes on ˜Dutchisms™. In one of his tirades against the workers and
women who frustrate him, we hear, ˜Avaunt, kitchen-stuff ! Rip, you brown-
bread tannikin, out of my sight!™ (7.63“4, my emphasis).
57 See Robert Wilson, An Edition of Robert Wilson™ s ˜ The Three Ladies of
London™ and ˜ Three Lords and Three Ladies of London™, ed. H. S. D. Mithal
(New York and London: Garland, 1988), lines 2105“69; sig. I“Iv.
58 Jones and Stallybrass, Renaissance Clothing and the Materials of Memory,
pp. 204“5.
59 Harris, ˜Properties of Skill™, pp. 51“2.
60 David Scott Kastan, ˜Workshop and/as Playhouse: Comedy and Commerce
in The Shoemaker™ s Holiday™, Studies in Philology 84 (1987): 324“37, p. 330.
61 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of
1844, in The Marx“Engels Reader, 2nd edn, ed. Robert C. Tucker (New York:
W. W. Norton, 1978), p. 72.
62 OED ˜drum™, entry 3b (the play is not cited by the OED). For use of the full
term see Robert Wilson, The Three Ladies of London, in Three Renaissance
Usury Plays, ed. Kermode, 8.127; Nashe, The Works, 2, p. 218; and Shake-
speare, All™ s Well that Ends Well, 3.6.34. A book from 1581 warned travellers to
Rome that they could expect to ¬nd in that city, ˜no hoste to intertaine you,
unlesse perhappes, some prettie noppes to make a ridying stocke: would
graunt you a breakefaste, and after she had laughed her ¬ll, give you Jacke
Drommes, entertainment, and thrust the contemner of Beautie, the dispraiser
of Love, the despiser of women, and the disparager of their honours, out of
the doores™ (Barnabe Rich, The Straunge and Wonderfull Adventures of Don
Simonides, a Gentilman Spaniarde (London, 1581), S3).
63 Signature citations are from Q1 1601.
64 Marston™s satirical characterization in Jack Drum and his involvement in the
war of the theatres more generally have been dealt with by a number of
authorities including E. K. Chambers, The Elizabethan Stage, 4 vols.
(Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1923), 3, p. 428, citing the representation of
Jonson in the play in the character of Brabant Senior; see also Anthony
Notes to pages 146“151
182
Caputi, John Marston, Satirist (Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1961);
Philip J. Finkelpearl, John Marston of the Middle Temple (Cambridge,
MA: Harvard University Press, 1969); R. W. Ingram, John Marston (Boston:
G. K. Hall, 1978), Chaps. 4“5; Michael Scott, John Marston™ s Plays: Theme,
Structure, and Performance (London: Macmillan, 1978); Morse S. Allen, The
Satire of John Marston (New York: Haskell House, 1965).
William Biddulph, The Travels of Certaine Englishmen into Africa, Asia, Troy,
65
Bythinia, Thracia, and into the Black Sea (1609; Facsimile. New York: Da
Capo Press, 1968), M4v (p. 74).
Francis Bacon, ˜Of Usury™, in The Essays or Counsells, Civill and Morall, ed.
66
Michael Kiernan (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1985), pp. 124“5.
Robert Greene, Selimus (London, 1594), G4v.
67
See Anthony Munday et al., Sir Thomas More, eds. Vittorio Gabrieli and
68
Giorgio Melchiori (Revels) (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1990),
2.1.21“2.
For this practice in Italy, see Poul Borchsenius, Behind the Wall: the Story of
69
the Ghetto, trans. Reginald Spink (London: George Allen and Unwin, 1964),
p. 94. For England, see Michael Adler, Jews of Medieval England (London:
The Jewish Historical Society, 1939), Chap. 6.
Stow, Survey, 1, p. 30.
70
C. J. Sisson concludes that ˜the whole colony of Portuguese Jews . . . did in
71
fact practise their true religion in secret, throughout the Tudor period™
(˜A Colony of Jews in Shakespeare™s London™, Essays and Studies 23 (1938):
38“52, p. 49).
Sisson, ˜A Colony of Jews™, pp. 45“6.
72
For broadsheets of evicted Jews see David Kunzle, The Early Comic Strip:
73
Narrative Strips and Picture Stories in the European Broadsheet from c. 1450 to
1825 (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972).
Finkelpearl, John Marston of the Middle Temple, p. 135.
74

P O S T S C R I P T : EA R L Y M O D E R N A N D P O S T - M O DE R N
ALIEN EXC URS IONS
1 Jeffrey Knapp, An Empire Nowhere: England, America, and Literature from
Utopia to The Tempest (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California
Press, 1992), p. 4.
2 See, for example, Barbara Fuchs™ essay, ˜Faithless Empires: Pirates, Renegadoes,
and the English Nation™, ELH 67 (2000): 45“69; also Daniel Vitkus™ edition
of Three Turk Plays from Early Modern England: Selimus, A Christian Turned
Turk, and The Renegado (New York: Columbia University Press, 2000).
3 Emily C. Bartels, Spectacles of Strangeness: Imperialism, Alienation, and Mar-
lowe (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1993), p. xiv. Jonathan
Burton counters that ˜Bartels™ notion of the Elizabethan period as marking “a
critical beginning in the drive toward domination” seems to me a backward
projection of the later British Empire™ (˜Anglo-Ottoman Relations and the
Notes to pages 151“152 183
Image of the Turk in Tamburlaine™, Journal of Medieval and Early Modern
Studies 30 (2000): 125“56, p. 129). But Bartels has already defended her pos-
ition: ˜Yet it was precisely because there was no established empire that the
promotion of the imperialist cause was so crucial. For how was the state to
impose its dominance across the globe until the ideological backing was vitally
and visibly in place at home?™ (Spectacles of Strangeness, p. xiv).
R. H. Tawney and E. Power, eds., Tudor Economic Documents, 3 vols.
4
(London: Longmans, Green, and Co., 1924), 2, p. 19.
Nabil Matar, Turks, Moors, and Englishmen in the Age of Discovery (New York:
5
Columbia University Press, 1999), p. 11.
Nabil Matar, Islam in Britain 1558“1685 (Cambridge: Cambridge University
6
Press, 1998), p. 52.
Steven Mullaney, ˜Strange Things, Gross Terms, Curious Customs: the
7
Rehearsal of Cultures in the Late Renaissance™, in Representing the Renaissance,
ed. Stephen Greenblatt (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California
Press, 1988), pp. 65“92, p. 73. (Originally published in Representations 3 [1983]:
40“67. Revised as Chap. 3 in Mullaney, The Place of the Stage: License, Play
and Power in Renaissance England (Chicago and London: University of Chi-
cago Press, 1988), p. 69.)
´
Rene Girard, Violence and the Sacred, trans. Patrick Gregory (Paris, 1972;
8
Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1979), p. 47.
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SECONDARY MODERN WOR KS
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Index




Acts of the Privy Council, 72, 76“8, 133 apparel, 17, 43“4, 45, 68, 133
Adonis, 106 and class, 135“7
Agnew, Jean-Christophe, 50 Arab, Ronda, 134
alien, Archer, Ian, 64, 164
˜alien stages™, 3“7 Archer, John Michael, 109
and ˜confusion™, 3“7, 12“14 Armada, Spanish, 13, 22, 27, 60, 61, 124, 153
and disease, 4, 17, 26, 32, 36“8, 43, 49, 51“2, Armitage, David, 102, 103
Averell, William,
54“5, 57“8, 67, 70, 76, 81“3, 86, 129“31,
Mervailous Combat of Contrareties, 36
143, 147“8
and foreign languages, 5“6, 20, 38“9, 111, 126“
8, 129, 133, 154, see also Wales: and Welsh Bacon, Francis,
language ˜Of Usury™, 146
and Turkish, 146 Baker, David, 20, 175
churches, 1, 18, 28“30, 63, see also Dutch Bartels, Emily, 150, 151, 157, 182
church libel Bayte and Snare of Fortune, The, 33
Dutch, 9, 16, 23, 25, 29, 31“2, 34“5, 41“3, Beckerman, Bernard, 161
Bedlam, 145“7
47“9, 54, 64, 71, 76, 83, 120, 126, 129“30,
131, 133, 135, 137“42, 145, see also Dutch Beer, M., 32
church libel Beier, A. L., 61
Flemish. See alien: Dutch Bevington, David, 40, 48
French, 1, 5, 8, 9, 21, 22, 25, 28“9, 34, 48“9, 71, Biddulph, William, 146
Blank, Paula, 99, 170
74, 79, 85, 100, 106, 115, 123, 126“8,
Boling, Roland, 173
129“30, 133, 135, 136, 142, 143, 145
German, 1, 34, 71, 140“1, 148 Bridewell, 133, 145“6
immigrants, 1“3, 28“9, 61“2, 140“1 Browne, Thomas, 178
Irish. See Wales: and Ireland Burghley, William Cecil, Lord, 62, 167
Italian, 1, 5, 8, 9, 18, 30, 59, 61, 62, 69, 70, Copie of a Letter, The, 160
Burse, the. See Exchange, the London
72, 131, 132
Spanish, 8, 9, 25, 27“8, 30“3, 34“6, Burton, Jonathan, 182
38“40, 60, 69, 71, 106, 124, 151, see also Butler, Judith, 158
Philip II, King of Spain, see also
Armada, Spanish Cady, Diane, 129
and hell, 35“6, 45 Campos, Edmund, 127
Turkish, 46“7, 48, 59, 60, 68, 69, 70, 71 Catherine of Aragon, 27
visitors, 64“5 censorship, 123
Welsh. See Wales and Master of the Revels, 76, 80, 123, see also
Althusser, Louis, 104 Tilney, Edmund
Alva, Duke of, 1, 61 Chambers, E. K., 160
Amman, Jost, Circe, 105
Theatre of Women, The, x Clark, Peter, 164
Anderson, Benedict, 12, 13 Collinson, Patrick, 29, 30

198
Index 199
Conscience (as morality character), 18, 37, 39, 52, Greenblatt, Stephen, 116, 165
Greene, Robert,
58, 59“60, 65“7, 146
Coryate, Thomas, 122 Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, 39, 98
Craik, T. W., 30, 31, 34 Looking Glass for London and England, A, 125
Croxton Play of the Sacrament, The, 18 Selimus, 147
Crutched Friars, 122, 130 Greenfield, Matthew, 102
Gresham, Thomas, 61, 119
Daborne, Robert, 150 Griffin, Eric, 27
Dalechamp, Caleb, Griffith, William, 174
Christian Hospitality, 67“8 Griffiths, Huw, 117
Deacon, John, Guilpin, Everard,
Tobacco Tortured, 71 Skialetheia, 72
Dekker, Thomas, 132 Gurr, Andrew, 98, 131, 171
Roaring Girl, The, 134
Shoemaker™ s Holiday, The, 21“2, 44, 84, 119, Hadfield, Andrew, 103, 173
Hakluyt, Richard, 151
120, 124, 125, 133“44
devil, 35“6, 44, 47, see also Lucifer Hansen, Adam, 87
Hanson, Elizabeth, 39
Dillon, Janette, 103, 104, 177, 179
disease. See alien: and disease Happe?, Peter, 56, 160
Dutch. See alien: Dutch Harris, Jonathan Gil, 26, 36“7, 58, 67, 143“4,
Dutch church libel, 18“19, 71“3, 77“8, 81, 170, 179
Harrison, William, 67
123, 140
Dutton, Richard, 77, 80, 168, 169 Description of England, 70
Dynes, William, 56 Haughton, William,
Englishmen for My Money, ix, 6, 21, 54, 119,
Edward VI, King, 1, 25, 26 120, 121“33, 136, 145
Edwards, Philip, 12 Grim the Collier of Croydon, 10
Elizabeth I, Queen, 1, 25, 26, 28“30, 77, 94, 120, Hawkes, Terence, 95, 105, 108, 112, 172
Heal, Felicity, 65
124, 140, 151
Everyman, 34 Helgerson, Richard, 8, 14
Exchange, the London, 119 Henry VI, King, 134
excursions. See journey (as trope in drama) Henry VII, King, 103, 106
Henry VIII, King, 95, 99, 151
Feyerabend, Sigmund, ix Henslowe, Philip, 124
Finkelpearl, Philip, 148, 181, 182 Diary, 10, 123, 126
Fitzpatrick, Joan, 82 Heywood, Thomas,
Fleck, Andrew, 120, 134, 138 2 If You Know Not Me, You Know
Florio, John, Nobody, 119
First Fruits, 5“6, 8, 15 Hickscorner, 17
Highley, Christopher, 93“4, 104
Floyd-Wilson, Mary, 15, 71, 158
Hill, Tracey, 80“1, 169
Foxe, John, 27“8
Hobbes, Thomas,
Fraser, Russell, 138
Leviathan, 33
Freedman, Barbara, 77, 167, 168
Freeman, Arthur, 72 Hoenselaars, A. J., 31, 38, 40, 46, 124, 126
French. See alien: French Hopkins, Lisa, 19, 89, 95, 106“7
Fulwell, Ulpian, Hospitality (as dramatic character), 18, 52, 65“9,
Like Will to Like, 16“17, 18, 23, 30, 39, 40“9, 137, 146, 149
Howard, Jean, 14, 79, 108, 119
55, 65, 86, 91, 120, 138

Gabrieli, Vittorio, 80, 82 imagination and theatre, 90“1
Gasper, Julia, 137 Ireland. See Wales: and Ireland
German. See alien: German Italian. See alien: Italian
Gillies, John, 19, 172, 173
Girard, Rene?, 153 Jamestown, 11
Goose, Nigel, 61, 64, 162 Jenkins, Philip, 94
Index
200
Jews. see also usury: and Jews Jack Drum™ s Entertainment, 21, 120, 129“30,
and ideas about Jewishness, 9, 19, 36, 46“8, 51, 131, 145“9
Marx, Karl, 144
67, 68, 72, 81, 123“4, 146“8
and odour, 130“1 Mary I, Queen, 25“7, 29, 32, 34“5
as dramatic characters, 18, 21, 54“5, 59, Master of the Revels. See censorship
Matar, Nabil, 151
67, 69“70, 72, 121“4, 125, 127“9,
May Day 1517 (Ill May Day), 76“8, 79
130“1, 147
in England, 122, 123“4, 130, 147“8 McBride, Charlotte, 48
Johnson, Thomas, McCluskey, Peter, 120
Cornucopiae, 121 McEachern, Claire, 104, 114, 116, 117
Jones, Ann Rosalind, 143 McMillin, Scott, 76, 77, 168, 170
Melchiori, Giorgio, 80, 82
journey (as trope in drama), 19, 85“7, 88“92
Middleton, Thomas,
and banishment, 89
Roaring Girl, The, 134
Mikalachki, Jodi, 8, 116, 175
Kastan, David Scott, 144
Kemp, Will, 153 Milton, John, 7
Kingsley-Smith, Jane, 86, 89, 91, 170 Mithal, H. S. D., 69
´
Klein, Bernhard, 19, 89, 171 Modius, FranOois, ix,
Knapp, Jeffrey, 68, 150 Montrose, Louis, 14
Korda, Natasha, 170, 179 Morrill, John, 87
Mullaney, Steven, 14, 111, 152
Lamentacion of England, 26“8, Munday, Anthony,
Sir Thomas More, 12, 18, 19, 21, 22,
32“3
Landau, Aaron, 14, 88 75“84, 86“7, 110, 119, 121, 123,
Leggatt, Alexander, 179 131, 147, 152
Lemnius, Levinus, Munro, Ian, 80
Notes on England, 64
Lloyd, Megan, 111 Nashe, Thomas,
Lodge, Thomas, Unfortunate Traveller, The, 130, 132
Larum for London, A, 28, 35 Neill, Michael, 94, 95
Looking Glass for London and England, A, Netzloff, Mark, 95
Neuss, Paula, 52, 161
125
London against the Three Ladies, 72 Nugent, Teresa, 74, 127
Lopez, Rodrigo, 153
Lord Chamberlain™s Men, 14 Odysseus, 105
Lucifer, 41, see also devil Orrell, John, 132, 179
as morality character, 16“17, 43“5 Oz, Avraham, 115
Luu, Lien Bich, 61, 155, 162, 179
Lyly, John, Pallavicino, Horatio, 61
Palliser, D. M., 162, 163
Euphues, 15
Palmer, Daryl, 65
Parker, Patricia, 106
MacIntyre, Jean, 180
Parr, Anthony, 138
MacLean, Sally-Beth, 170
Pettegree, Andrew, 25, 159
Maley, Willy, 20, 96, 98, 103, 115,
Philip II, King of Spain, 25“7, 30, 32, 34“5
172, 173
Mankind, 17 Platter, Thomas,
mapping, 19“20, 89, 98, 99“102, see also Thomas Platter™ s Travels in England,
topography 10“11, 61
Marlowe, Christopher, 56, 71, 72 Pocock, J. G. A., 20
Dr Faustus, 98 Porter, Gerald, 139
Edward II, 132 Prichard, Rhys, 113
Jew of Malta, The, 122, 128, 147, 148 Proclamations, 25, 28“9, 62
Tamburlaine, Parts One and Two, 101 prodigality in drama, 121, 125, 128, 129, 135, 136,
Marston, John, 140, 142
Histriomastix, 39 Purchas, Samuel, 151
Index 201
Queen™s Men, The, 59, 72, 87 Stock, Angela, 178
Stoppard, Tom,
Rabkin, Norman, 138 Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, 90
Rackin, Phyllis, 79 Stow, John,
Raleigh, Walter, 151 Survey of London, A, 62“3, 147
Rappaport, Steve, 64, 163, 164 Stradling, John,
Rastell, John, Direction for Trauailers, A, 70
Exposition of Certaine Dif¬cult and Obscure Stubbes, Philip,
Words, An, 169 Anatomie of Abuses, The, 43“4, 70“1
Read, David, 88 Sullivan, Garrett, 19, 117
riot, anti-alien, 123, see also Dutch church libel,
see also May Day 1517 (IU Tarlton, Richard, 153
May Day) theatre,
and drama, 75“84 and building structure, 74, 90, 131“2
Roberts, Peter, 112, 174 and imagination, 86“7
Russell, Conrad, 163 Thomas of Woodstock, 99
Thorne, Robert, 151
Saunders, Laurence, Tilney, Edmund, 80, 123, 152
Trewe Mirrour, A, 25“6 Timms, L. D., 140
Schwyzer, Philip, 95, 96, 115 Tittler, Robert, 136
Serres, Michel, 37 topography, 85, 131, see also mapping
Turkish. See alien: Turkish
Shakespeare, William, 13, 14, 30
Tyrone, Hugh O™Neill, Earl of, 93“4, see also
Coriolanus, 105
Wales: and Ireland
Cymbeline, 115“18
King Lear, 101, 106, 107
usury, 55, 57“8, 66, 72, 74, 122“3, 125, 127, 138,
Measure for Measure, 32, 127
Merchant of Venice, The, 54“5, 69, 110, 122, 141, 146
and Jews, 18, 21, 72, 121“4, 125, 128“9
128, 129
Anti-Usury Statute (1571), 66, 74, 125
Othello, 44, 110
second tetralogy, 19“20, 78, 79, 83, as morality character, 58, 59, 65“6, 67, 69“70,
85“118, 135 73“4, 124, 125, 141, 146
1 Henry IV, 92“6, 102“13, 134, 142, 148 brokers, 55
2 Henry IV, 110, 142 gentlemen lending at interest, 125
Henry V, 53, 82, 90“1, 113“17, 135, 150
Richard II, 88“92, 94, 96“102 Vanhoutte, Jacqueline, 99
Tempest, The, 10, 104, 111 Vitkus, Daniel, 69
Titus Andronicus, 99
Shapiro, James, 123, 176, 177, 179 Wager, William,
Shirley, James, 150 Enough Is as Good as a Feast, 39
Sisson, C. J., 182 Wales,
Slack, Paul, 164 and borders, 98, 100“1, 102, 104, 106, 108, 110,
Smith, Emma, 177 116, 118
Spain. See alien: Spanish and gender, 82, 104“8, 116
Spanish. See alien: Spanish and Ireland, 2, 8, 15, 20, 92“6, 102,
Spenser, Edmund, 95 114, 124
Faerie Queene, The, 105 and Richard II, 96“101, 102
Spinola, Benedict, 141 and Welsh language, 99, 104, 110“13
St Katherine™s Hospital, 43 suppression in criticism, 92“6
St Paul™s Cathedral, 50 Wapull, George,
Stallybrass, Peter, 143 Tide Tarrieth No Man, The, 17, 23“4, 29,
Statutes of the Realm, 3, 62, 94, 95, 99, 106, 112 33, 37, 38, 40“1, 49“58, 61, 67, 74, 91,
Anti-Usury Statute (1571). See usury: 127, 142
Anti-Usury Statute (1571) Ward, Joseph, 64, 72, 137
Steinsaltz, David, 112 Warneke, Sara, 34, 71, 166
Weakest Goeth to the Wall, The, 28, 35
Stevenson, Laura Caroline, 123, 177
Index
202
Wealth and Health, 16, 17, 23, 27, 30“40, Woman Will Have Her Will, A. See Haughton:
William: Englishmen for My Money
41“2, 43, 44, 48, 51, 83, 120, 138,
Wood, Diana, 32
140, 141, 146
Welsh. See Wales Wright, Celeste Turner, 176
Williams, Glanmor, 105, 110 Wright, Louis, 74
Wunderkammer, 153
Wilson, Robert, 30, 121, 146
¨
Three Ladies of London, The, ix, 17“19, 30, 33, Wurttemberg, Duke of, 30, 64“5
Wyatt, Michael, 162
37, 38, 39, 40, 44, 52, 58, 59“76, 78, 80,
120, 123, 124, 125, 127, 136, 138, 141
Three Lords and Three Ladies of London, The, Yarington, Robert,
Two Lamentable Tragedies, 70
2, 59“76, 84, 127, 132, 140, 142
Wilson, Thomas, 147 Yungblut, Laura Hunt, 38, 162, 163

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